Matias.Inks-melancoly

musicology #0756

Nubag #24 (a year in the life)

Black Up – Karl Bryan & Count Ossie

“Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars”. Khalil Gibran

Watch over me….x

musicology #0731

word/sound/power #1

Prince Malachi – Trodition

rolling out a selection of personal favourites on themusicologist over the next few days/weeks/months in an effort to keep the wolves from ‘the door’. after all, what better way to soothe the ‘savage beast’ than with sweet music…

first up is this top drawer piece of roots courtesy of Prince Malachi. Released on the Roots Hitek label in 2006.

soho-old-london-photos.

musicology #0703

aHymnForCon #9

John Holt – I See Your Face

“No truth can cure the sorrow we feel from losing a loved one. No truth, no sincerity, no strength, no kindness can cure that sorrow. All we can do is see it through to the end and learn something from it, but what we learn will be no help in facing the next sorrow that comes to us without warning.”
– Haruki Murakami

x

Mass.9B.Cornwall

musicology #0675

aSongforCon #14

the Wailers – Dreamland

Conis chan … we’ll count the stars up in the sky and surely……we’ll never die. x

Con Victorian Village

musicology #0669

aSongforCon #8

Marcia Griffiths – the First Time Ever I Saw Your Face

NOTHING could prepare me for the heartache of my childs death but music certainly helps to process and ease the pain. Please watch over me Kohzu…until we meet again x

Borges, Jorge Luis - In Praise of Darkness 1975

musicology #0665

aSongforCon #4

Jackie Mittoo – (life is a) Merry Go Round

“There exists no more difficult art than living. For other arts and sciences, numerous teachers are to be found everywhere. Even young people believe that they have acquired these in such a way, that they can teach them to others. Throughout the whole of life, one must continue to learn to live and, what will amaze you even more, throughout life one must learn to die.” – SENECA –

musicology #0659

Earl Sixteen – Changing World

Jumping back into themusicologist saddle with this Top ranking, Augustus Pablo produced Late 70’s piece of social critique, courtesy of the Majestic Earl ’16’ Daley.

I leave it to the man himself to tell his story…

(borrowed from an interview conducted by father ‘Small Axe’…maximum respect is always due)

Link to FULL interview.

“Basically, I started out on the street corner, under the light post, with all the boys, hanging out at night. I started out at Waltham Park Road, where I grew up, in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of about 13, I started getting into like, Chi-Lites music, ’cause in Jamaica we’ve got a big influence of American music. I kind of started to listen to a lot of soul American stuff, Chat, (Chuck) Jackson (?), James Brown music, and all this and all that. Usually, after like doing my… ’cause you know, I lived with my Auntie at the time. On Saturdays, I used to turn up the radio and do my housework, and listen to the radio, and in the nights, when we get out on the streets, sometimes I’d be singing, “Trash man didn’t get no trash today,” like “People Makes the World Go Round” The guys kind of liked how my voice kind of sounded, ’cause I used to try to sing exactly like the actual records.

In those days, the good old days, everybody was into singing like Dennis Brown. Dennis Brown at that time was like one of the most influential artists, he was really progressive at that time, he was young still. All the school boys and kids who liked music, we used to like always try to pack on Dennis Brown, because he’s like a role model for us. So I kind of started out with that, but I was more like singing falsetto, like Pavoratti kind of stuff. Afterwards, after that, they had Vere Johns, talent contests going on in night clubs around Kingston. There was one at the Turntable Club, there was one at the Vere Johns, and there was one at the Bohemia Club, which was closer to me in Half Way Tree. One of the guys who used to hang out with us, Donald Hossack, he used to teach music like keyboards, piano. He encouraged me to enter one of the talent contests.

During that time I was still going to Church and singing now and again on the choir, and I started doing solo stuff, out from the choir, just singing songs all on my own, because I had this really unique kind of voice and all the people liked my voice. I was in the Church, but I wanted to get involved in some of the Chi-Lites stuff, some of the soul stuff, because the parties were happening, you get the girls and all that. I went to try and get an audition for the talent contest; I was about 14, 15 then, still going to high school. When I went and did the auditions, it turned out that I got picked in the audition, then went to the heats and I reached up to the finals.

In this final, there was like Michael Rose, Junior Moore from the Tamlins, there was myself, there was a girl called Joy White, she’s brilliant, I still love her, and there was another girl, I think it was Sabrina Williams. There was about six of us in the final, that’s a big night. Anyway, I kind of scraped through, I was biting my nails, but I made sure that I did my homework. I practised this tune 24 hours a day, “Peek a Boo,” one by the Chi-Lites, it was a big song in Jamaica so a lot of people knew it. When I did it, I ended up winning the 25 dollars (on) boxing day, I was too small to drink the beers so I had to give them all away (laughs), but after that I started getting the buzz, I started getting addicted to it. I like how the crowd cheers me, so when I left high school, I passed my exams, and I was meant to go to Commercial High School, which is like a college, St. Andrew Technical. I started going there, but I was really involved in the music, I wanted to form a group. I actually had formed a group called the Flaming Phonics. We were doing school barbecues, school fetes, playing in auditoriums around the country, like Calabar, mainly the high schools, Holy Child Girl’s School……”

themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt
themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt

musicology #0650 (Truth&RightsRemix)

Johnny Osbourne – Truth & Rights

themusicologist is back in the saddle today with a remix of the Johnny Osbourne Downbeat Roots Classic ‘Truth & Rights’. Recorded in the late 70’s at Sir Coxsons Studio 1, although in truth it was, like  much of Coxsons later output an overdub recorded over an early 70’s ‘golden age’ Studio 1 rhythm, a practice originated by Sugar Minott  a few years earlier.

By the late 70’s Jamaica was on the edge and Kingston was to all intents and purposes a battlefield. The economy had collapsed due, (in part), to outside influence as well as infighting between the opposing forces of the JLP and the PNP. Without going into too long a narrative Jamaica, (and the Caribbean) was on the frontline of the Cold War. Manley was a ‘Socialist’ and Seaga was a ‘Capitalist’ and the war that erupted was instigated by outside pressure to destabilise the situation. The age of ‘Roots & Culture’, One Love and ‘Ites was almost over and the ‘Gunman’ style was on the march. Studio 1, (as a creative force), was too all intents and purposes finished and Sir Coxson was relocating to the relative peace and safety !!! of Brooklyn signalling the end of the mightiest of Jamaica’s Musical powerhouses…

The rhythm for this tune was originally recorded at Studio 1 in the early part of the 70’s and released as ‘Take a Ride’ (miscredited to Al Campbell). Johnny Osbourne’s Truth and Rights was, (to the best of my knowledge), never released as a 7 Inch and was only available on the LP, (along with other ‘golden age’ overdubs), anyway…before i digress here is my tribute version to one of the mightiest of the Studio 1 roots cuts…

TruthRemix-Label

themusicologist meets Downbeat @ bloodSweatandteeS

part 2 of theUrbanMusicologyProJect…

Selected by themusicologist in tribute to Jamaica’s Soundsystem and Recording Studio HEAVYWEiGHT Sir Coxsone Downbeat the Ruler Dodd and FULL Brentford Road Crew.

I have waxed lyrical MANY times, (and dropped the needle on a number of supreme cuts), over the years here about the greatness of Studio 1 and some of its chief protagonists ..cats like Jackie Mittoo, Leroy Sibbles, Joe Higgs, Ken Boothe, the Skatalites, (to name a few), and how they carried the swing throughout the early days of Ska, Rocksteady and into Reggae. In fact I LOVE Studio 1 so much it led me to design and produce the tribute tShirt in Sir Coxsone’s honour which in turn inspired the formation and formulation of bloodSweatandteeS. Of course there were plenty of other producers along the way like Duke Reid, Justin Yap, Prince Buster, Lee Perry, Bunny Lee, King Tubby and the Hookim family but, at least as far as i am concerned, Downbeat was and will always remain the ruling sound. themusicologist IS a journey and as such the most effective way to illustrate what music means to me and how much it has informed my life is to lay down ‘SouLRebeLSymphonies’ rather than the the ‘1Shot’ that has dominated themusicologist for the past 4/5 years. I have played and listen to music this way for almost 30 years so it is also part of my narrative and authenticity so I hope you will allow me to indulge this part of my self as well as do me the favour of listening to it this way? The works of art on this mix were recorded and released from the late 60’s through to the mid 70’s, (with a few later cuts sprinkled in), when the Downbeat sound dominated. Before that the main rivalry, (especially record wise), was between Downbeat and the Trojan and even though there were some great producers throughout the age Studio 1 was the Home of Reggae and recording for Coxsone was the goal for almost all of the artists throughout the 60’s and early 70’s…..

to conclude todays monologue..I STRONGLY believe that music is for sharing and playing in your own environment so the mix is available to download and if you like Reggae and especially Studio 1 then i implore you to ‘fill your boots’ (and if you like it feel free to share it with your community.)

the bloodSweatandteeS Sir Coxsone Downbeat’ tribute tShirts, (below the soundcloud player), are available in various colours and there are still some sizes left so if you are looking to represent now’s the time as some of the combinations will not be repeated due to my desire to innovate continuously !

the ORiGiNAL ‘SouLRebeL’ tributeTees

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

themusicologist meets KiNG Tubby @bloodSweatandteeS

theUrbanMusicologyProJect #1

themusicologist is evolving into a new phase..out of the ‘1 tune’ and into ‘the mix’. Less ‘talking’ and more ‘walking’ with the added bonus of, (for a limited time), being downloadable for themusicologist family, friends,  shipmates, and FULL crew.

FiRST up is a tribute to Osbourne ‘KiNG TUBBY’ Ruddock. the Heavyweight Champion of DUB who is pivotal in the development of not only Jamaican Music but almost every kind of ‘Dance’ Music that followed. Hip Hop, House, Dubstep, Jungle, Drum & Bass..EVERYone of them owes a debt to the KiNG.. So without further delay hold/download this mix and blend of KiLLER DubWise cuts from the KiNGS Studio.

p.s I’m not sure how Long this set will be available for Download as Soundcloud charges a monthly fee, (which I pay), but the package I am on is limited so if you like the set then don’t delay..download today. All I ask is that if you like it then please click the ‘Heart’ to show some love and if you FEELING it strong then a comment would be greatly appreciated.

LiMITED EDiTiON ‘TUBBYs HoMEToWN HiFi’ TributeTeeS designed and produced by themusicologist , (as a ‘momento of the experience’). Available EXCLUSiVELY at

bloodSweatandteeS

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

musicology #0649

Hugh Mundell – Book Of Life

Augustus Pablo produced TOP Drawer, HEAVYweight 1976 roots classic from 16 year old vocalist Hugh Mundell..featuring, (among others), Jamaican drummer supreme Leroy ‘Horsemouth’ Wallace on Drums and the mighty EarL ‘Chinna’ Smith on Guitar…selected from the ‘Africa Must Be Free By 1983’ LP

musicology #0648

Augustus Pablo – Casava Piece

Classic Pablo….heavyweight instrumental Rockers cut to Jacob Miller’s ‘Baby I Love You So’…

tunes like these are what inspired the A.P Special tribute tShirt

musicology #0647

Augustus Pablo – Too Late      

I remember the days when themusicologist’s only piece of online communication was here…bwooooooooooooyyyyyyyyy them days are LONG gone. Now it’s Facebook, Youtube, Instagram, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Tumblr, Twitter and Pintrest which are all branches of the #tUmp tree. Of course that’s the way of an Organic, Natural evolving project. The seed is planted and the tree begins it’s journey. Not that I’m complaining, for me, the authentic life is like that. Music was, is and will always be the air I breathe and I believe that theUrbanMusicologyProject is my lifes ‘work’ and I am happy to give it all I have….anyway enough about me and back to the music.

second up in the A.P Special theme is this cut the instrumental version of Alton Ellis’s (previously featured), KILLER: ‘Too Late To Turn Back Now’…

musicology #0646

A.P Special #1

Jacob Miller – Baby I Love You So

New theme starting today and it’s all about the man Horace Swaby aka Augustus Pablo. I’ll keep the narrative brief as it seems to restrict the frequency of my posts and after all themusicologist is primarily about the music..so without further script hold this top drawer cut featuring Augustus Pablo, Jacob Miller and the Rockers crew..

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

musicology #0630

Earl Sixteen – Freedom (theUrbanmusicologist mix)

Today’s MASSIVE cut is courtesy of The MAJESTIC Earl John Daley aka Earl 16..who started his recording career at Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle in vocal group The Flaming Phonics but had little impact until after going Solo in 1975. Teaming up first with Derrick Harriott and then Boris Gardner before linking with Lee Perry in the late 70’s when he waxed a few gems for the Upsetter at the Black Ark..

In a, (top ranking), interview from AUTHENTIC Reggae periodical Small Axe Earl has this to say about the session….

“We actually laid the track with Dalton Browne, that was actually the first time that Steelie came to the studio as well, we first brought him, Steelie, Albert Malawi, (he used to play in sound system, but he’s a drummer), and Dalton Browne, that’s the musicians that we used for that session, and we did four songs all at once. We did “Cheatin” (?) was played by Boris Gardener, and “Bird in the Hand”, those two were played by Boris Gardner, but “Give Black People Freedom” and “Do Good and Good Will Follow You” was played by Albert and them lot”.

BIG piece of Rebel Music, (mixed down by themusicologist)…….

musicology #0629

Errol Walker – In These Times

day Two of theUpsetter triBute……I’ll keep it brief and let the music speak.

the bat eared amongst you will notice that this is of course a version of the George Gershwin song Summertime but rinsed through the genius of Lee Perry and the Black Ark.

KILLER Black Ark selection from Errol Walker and theUpsetter…I have mixed in the, (at the time), unreleased Dub for the FULL Black Ark Experience….

musicology #0628

The Silvertones – Bring It On Home

For the next couple of weeks themusicologist is focusing on Lee Perry, The Upsetter, Chicken Scratch, Little Lee. A man whose impact on Jamaica’s, (and the world’s), soundtrack is, (almost), as big as Coxsone Dodd’s.

No surprise that the Upsetter began his career beside Dodd and even less of a surprise that they parted due to, (as far as Lee Perry is concerned), Downbeat’s failure to reward his creative endeavours….a common Jamaican tale which I am not in a position to pass judgement on, (and nor would I no matter what I knew)

Anyway, the(urBan)musicologist ain’t about hearsay and rumour….STRICTLY music and Lee Perry and Coxsone Dodd helped shape Jamaican music into what we know and love.

Studio 1 carried the swing throughout the 1960’s and early 1970’s but Lee Perry emerged with the ‘Soul Rebel’ sound in the late 60’s and wrestled the (recording) Crown from Sir Coxsone between 1972-1977..Channel 1 was there as where a whole host of producers during the period but, (as with Coxsone Dodd), Lee Perry changed the game.

It was Lee Perry who insisted that Bob Marley reform the Wailers rather than go it alone after returning from abroad in 1968 and history went on to be made. It was Lee Perry whose ‘Black Ark’ RULED from late 1973 until 1978 recording a HEAP of classic, KILLER material with many of the great Jamaican musicologists and whenever we reflect on Jamaican musical history Lee Perry’s name is right up there with the Champions.

Today’s cut is courtesy of The Silvertones Gilmore Grant, Keith Coley and Delroy Denton who first recorded for Duke Reid in 1965? with the magnificent Ska tune ‘True Confession’, (buried somewhere on themusicologist !!) following up with some quality Rock Steady and early Reggae for various producers, (including Lee Perry).

Before I drown in a sea of monologue and information please allow me to cut this short..

According to David Katz’s excellent book ‘People Funny Boy’ the rhythms for this piece were recorded at the, (almost completed), Black Ark and the vocals at King Tubby’s Studio at the dawning of 1973? and the musicians consisted of Hux Brown, Ansel Collins, Ranchie McLean and Anthony ‘Benbow’ Creary…

Finally I just want to add that I rate this tune and the Silvertones HIGHLY…oh yeah….It’s a cover of Sam Cooke’s ‘Bring It On Home To Me’

theUpsetter triButetee available in various colours @

bloOdsweatandteeS

musicology #403

Catharsis #1

(Lord Creator – I’m Wasting Time)

Still struggling to find direction on themusicologist. It’s not inspiration that’s the problem, (music always delivers), or that I don’t have themes in mind maybe it’s a simple matter of the fallout from the metamorphosis that I am in the middle of. Want it straight?

My partner, (and mother of our children), has, after twenty years, called time on our relationship for the second, (and final), time in 12 months. Why am I laying this out here on themusicologist? ’cause it’s distracting, painful and needs exorcising and where better to get some therapy than here through the form that for me has always delivered catharsis.

Don’t worry though as I’m certainly not going to let the black cloud descend. Nietzsche once wrote, (in The Genealogy Of Morals)

“All instincts which do not find a vent outside oneself turn inwards” and that in a sentance sums up what themusicologist is for me…a vent for my instincts.

First up is a piece from Kendrick Patrick a.k.a Lord Creator who has already featured on themusicologist with his majestic 1968 cut Such Is Life. Produced by Vincent Chin and released on his Top Ranking Randy’s label in the first half of the 1960’s.

musicology #401

Sound&Fury #5

(Prince Buster – Too Hot)

Original cut of the song made ‘public’ by the Specials. The Prince has already featured on themusicologist so no need for me to wax lyrical about his life. Suffice to say that the Cat is a legend of Jamaican musicology.

musicology #291

JamaicanVocalGroupAction #2

(The Heptones – One Love)

Today’s cut is from the mighty Heptones, (Leroy Sibbles, Barry Llewelyn and Earl Morgan). One of the top ranking Jamaican vocal groups throughout the sixties and seventies. Not only that but Leroy Sibbles, (as mentioned previously on themusicologist), was an important part of Coxsone Dodd’s Studio One production team as Bass player, Musical director and all round musicologist during it’s ‘Golden Age’  until his departure for Canada in 1973. With Jackie Mittoo and Leroy gone Studio 1 began to lose it’s edge until younger Cats like Sugar Minott took up the baton a few years later. This, (1971?), piece is a slice from them glorious, Golden days off the album Freedom Line