musicology #0659

Earl Sixteen – Changing World

Jumping back into themusicologist saddle with this Top ranking, Augustus Pablo produced Late 70’s piece of social critique, courtesy of the Majestic Earl ’16’ Daley.

I leave it to the man himself to tell his story…

(borrowed from an interview conducted by father ‘Small Axe’…maximum respect is always due)

Link to FULL interview.

“Basically, I started out on the street corner, under the light post, with all the boys, hanging out at night. I started out at Waltham Park Road, where I grew up, in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of about 13, I started getting into like, Chi-Lites music, ’cause in Jamaica we’ve got a big influence of American music. I kind of started to listen to a lot of soul American stuff, Chat, (Chuck) Jackson (?), James Brown music, and all this and all that. Usually, after like doing my… ’cause you know, I lived with my Auntie at the time. On Saturdays, I used to turn up the radio and do my housework, and listen to the radio, and in the nights, when we get out on the streets, sometimes I’d be singing, “Trash man didn’t get no trash today,” like “People Makes the World Go Round” The guys kind of liked how my voice kind of sounded, ’cause I used to try to sing exactly like the actual records.

In those days, the good old days, everybody was into singing like Dennis Brown. Dennis Brown at that time was like one of the most influential artists, he was really progressive at that time, he was young still. All the school boys and kids who liked music, we used to like always try to pack on Dennis Brown, because he’s like a role model for us. So I kind of started out with that, but I was more like singing falsetto, like Pavoratti kind of stuff. Afterwards, after that, they had Vere Johns, talent contests going on in night clubs around Kingston. There was one at the Turntable Club, there was one at the Vere Johns, and there was one at the Bohemia Club, which was closer to me in Half Way Tree. One of the guys who used to hang out with us, Donald Hossack, he used to teach music like keyboards, piano. He encouraged me to enter one of the talent contests.

During that time I was still going to Church and singing now and again on the choir, and I started doing solo stuff, out from the choir, just singing songs all on my own, because I had this really unique kind of voice and all the people liked my voice. I was in the Church, but I wanted to get involved in some of the Chi-Lites stuff, some of the soul stuff, because the parties were happening, you get the girls and all that. I went to try and get an audition for the talent contest; I was about 14, 15 then, still going to high school. When I went and did the auditions, it turned out that I got picked in the audition, then went to the heats and I reached up to the finals.

In this final, there was like Michael Rose, Junior Moore from the Tamlins, there was myself, there was a girl called Joy White, she’s brilliant, I still love her, and there was another girl, I think it was Sabrina Williams. There was about six of us in the final, that’s a big night. Anyway, I kind of scraped through, I was biting my nails, but I made sure that I did my homework. I practised this tune 24 hours a day, “Peek a Boo,” one by the Chi-Lites, it was a big song in Jamaica so a lot of people knew it. When I did it, I ended up winning the 25 dollars (on) boxing day, I was too small to drink the beers so I had to give them all away (laughs), but after that I started getting the buzz, I started getting addicted to it. I like how the crowd cheers me, so when I left high school, I passed my exams, and I was meant to go to Commercial High School, which is like a college, St. Andrew Technical. I started going there, but I was really involved in the music, I wanted to form a group. I actually had formed a group called the Flaming Phonics. We were doing school barbecues, school fetes, playing in auditoriums around the country, like Calabar, mainly the high schools, Holy Child Girl’s School……”

themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt
themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt

bloodSweatandteeS Special

bSt-JULY13-SPECiAL-Coxson-ARMY

musicology #0656

Tribute to Don Pedro #6

the Sensations – Right On Time

Out of the Rhythm & Blues and into the Rocksteady with this majestic cover of the Impressions cut. Rarely does a cover do justice to the original for me but this one is an exception to the rule..

Written by Master Curtis Mayfield and originally recorded by the Impressions for the 1966 Ridin’ High LP the Sensations recorded this version in 1967. Released in the UK on Graeme Goodall’s Doctor Bird label this is a BiG piece from the Sensations, a group originally formed by Jimmy Riley and Cornel Campbell that featured, (along the way), Buster Riley, Aaron ‘Bobby’ Davis, Johnny Osbourne and Jackie Parris, who the lead is on todays fine piece im not sure but i’m guessing its Jackie Parris rather than Jimmy who had moved onto one of Jamaica’s greatest vocal groups the Uniques by 1967 but it could even be Cornel Campbell?

one thing IS for SURE…the tune is a top ranking, nailed on marrow trembler and one that I’m sure Don Pedro will appreciate as the surf hits the shore on another day in paradise and he watches the sun sink over the pacific as the Don is world renowned for ALWAYS being ‘Right On Time’.

BIG up yourself Don Pedro….

musicology #0655 Daddy Woo Woo

Tribute to DON Pedro #5

the Vibrations – Daddy Woo Woo

sliding out of the Ska and into the 60’s Rhythm and Blues with this cut from the Vibrations. A vocal group who first appeared on the scene as the Jay Hawks in 1956 and had a ‘hit’ with; Stranded in the Jungle, (remind me to dig it out from the vaults and lay it down), as well as notable early ‘Soul’ cuts Oh Cindy, Since I Fell For You, the Watusi, Peanut Butter and the classic My Girl Sloopy.

Don Pedro shares a West Coast connection with these cats who hail from the City Of Angels in California. the Don took up residency there for many years after deciding it was time to leave the auld Country and head out West to stroll the Boulevards.

Back in the day the Don and I used to be found frequenting ‘Mod’ hang outs. I had become disillusioned with the rare Funk clique and was in between scenes and even though it was my second time, (once a mod/ern/ist always a mod/ern/ist), the scene had evolved, (or maybe it was us who had evolved??), anyway we had some memorable times together and it was there that my love and respect for the Don was born…again I digress so i’ll leave it there. Suffice it to say that the music connects us and i Know that he will enjoy this one… recorded for and released on Atlantic in 1964.

musicology #0654 Special Event

Tribute to DON Pedro #4

Baba Brooks – Special Event

Don Pedro is a lover of the fine things in life…a purveyor of quality and style. Be it women, vehicles, garments, food, ‘kettles’, ‘Tom’ and anything else that catches his attention. Anyone who knows the Don will clarify that the Cats antenna is finely tuned. That’s not to say that he can’t or doesn’t know how to get down with all manner of people as the Don posseses that rare quality of being comfortable in his own skin and therefore non judgemental of others regardless of how they ‘hang’. A proper ‘man of the world’ the DON has seen and lived more on his travels through life than most. I wax lyrical about the man because those of us who have shared some of them travels can say that they have lived too. The Don asks for for little but gives plenty.

Anyway before i digress and get lost, (im on a TIGHT schedule on this fine sunny morning in London Town), …hold this rip roaring piece of Jamaican Ska from led by one its greatest protagonists the mighty Oswald ‘Baba’ Brooks featuring the cream of Jamaica’s musical fraternity. Recorded for Duke Reid and released on his Treasure Isle label in, (what sounds to me like 1965) ..

BiG Piece of urbanmusicology

musicology #0653 Perseverance

Tribute to DON Pedro #3

Count Lasher – Perseverance

Big piece of Mento from Jamaican musicologist and knowledgehustler supreme the great Terence Parkins aka Count Lasher whose lyricosity and verbal dexterity is as good as it gets… 1954 Release on the Caribou Label.

Step up Count Lasher for my man Don Pedro…

musicology #0652 Don’t Let Nobody

tribute to Don Pedro #2

Joe Morris – Don’t Let Nobody

sticking with the Rhythm and Blues selection for round two with more Don Pedro Philosophy..but before, during or after the cut i hope you will lend me your ear as i wax philosophically on this thing called Life…

the age old question of meaning is one i often ponder as i walk down the road and the longer the journey goes on the clearer i can see the path. for me life’s meaning is in the relationships we forge. not the aquaintances, the authentic connections to each other. the ones that present us with the opportunity to be ourselves, without fear or damnation. In the play Macbeth, Shakespere wrote the words:

“Out, out brief candle, life’s but a walking shadow a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signyfying nothing”

is it? … I have been honoured to share the journey with Giants along the way and regardless of how long we rolled together they continue to have a positive influence on me. They are by no means angels of virtue but their actions and non actions have touched the depths of me soul.

Don Pedro is one of them giants and the relationship will always be a cherished one.

This selection is taking shape serendipitously as today’s cut features the Gigantic Joe Morris, (another major player at the forefront of the shift from big band swing to small band jump/rhythm and blues), who, in his brief career, journeyed with some heavyweights such as Dizzy Gillespie, Lionel Hampton, Big Joe Turner, Dinah Washington, Wynonie Harris, as well as being the unoficial house band at Atlantic records in the early 50’s when Cats like brother Ray and Lowell Fulsom were cutting their R&B teeth. His candle went out at the tender age of 36 but half a century on and his voice is still heard loud and clear…

Like the man says..

“Don’t let nobody mess all over you”

musicology #0651- Let the Good Times ROLL

Tribute to DON Pedro #1

Louis Jordan – Let The Good Times Roll

cracking on with a new selection in tribute to a genuine living legend who i call Don Pedro, a KING amongst pawns who is an inspiration. Before i kick off though allow me to talk a while.

Hopefully everyone knows a ‘Don Pedro’ one of them Cats whose actions speak MUCH louder than their words. Trailblazers who lead, Shepherds not sheep who ‘Walk the Walk’ rather than ‘Talk the Talk’. I first met Don Pedro in my late teens, the man was sharp like PAPER. Never settling for anything less than the best that life was offering. International traveller with a taste for the fine things. Don Pedro hustled with the best and could sell snow to eskimos. The best hustlers are the ones that present opportunities rather than try to take you for what you’ve got and Don Pedro was right up there with the champions. Life was/is NEVER dull when you are rolling with the Don. Memories are made of these connections and relationships like these are rare and full of life. Pedro lives life to the FULL and this selection is in his honour. Enough with the words and on with the music. STRICTLY boss tunes for the Don from across the musical spectrum

Roll on DON Pedro you touch and continue to inspire everyone who has the fortune to call you friend…

First up is a slice from one of the Rhythm and Blues pioneers whose Tympany 5 was instrumental in changing the direction of urbanmusicology from Big Band Swing to Small Band Rhythm & Blues and in the process inspired a new genre. a GENUINE legend Louis Jordan and Don Pedro speak the same language, sing from the same hymn sheet, blow the same horn and would have rolled together in the 1940’s. NO doubt.

Fitting start to the selection as Don Pedro ALWAYS made sure to ‘Let The Good Times Roll’

themusicologist meets Downbeat @ bloodSweatandteeS

part 2 of theUrbanMusicologyProJect…

Selected by themusicologist in tribute to Jamaica’s Soundsystem and Recording Studio HEAVYWEiGHT Sir Coxsone Downbeat the Ruler Dodd and FULL Brentford Road Crew.

I have waxed lyrical MANY times, (and dropped the needle on a number of supreme cuts), over the years here about the greatness of Studio 1 and some of its chief protagonists ..cats like Jackie Mittoo, Leroy Sibbles, Joe Higgs, Ken Boothe, the Skatalites, (to name a few), and how they carried the swing throughout the early days of Ska, Rocksteady and into Reggae. In fact I LOVE Studio 1 so much it led me to design and produce the tribute tShirt in Sir Coxsone’s honour which in turn inspired the formation and formulation of bloodSweatandteeS. Of course there were plenty of other producers along the way like Duke Reid, Justin Yap, Prince Buster, Lee Perry, Bunny Lee, King Tubby and the Hookim family but, at least as far as i am concerned, Downbeat was and will always remain the ruling sound. themusicologist IS a journey and as such the most effective way to illustrate what music means to me and how much it has informed my life is to lay down ‘SouLRebeLSymphonies’ rather than the the ‘1Shot’ that has dominated themusicologist for the past 4/5 years. I have played and listen to music this way for almost 30 years so it is also part of my narrative and authenticity so I hope you will allow me to indulge this part of my self as well as do me the favour of listening to it this way? The works of art on this mix were recorded and released from the late 60’s through to the mid 70’s, (with a few later cuts sprinkled in), when the Downbeat sound dominated. Before that the main rivalry, (especially record wise), was between Downbeat and the Trojan and even though there were some great producers throughout the age Studio 1 was the Home of Reggae and recording for Coxsone was the goal for almost all of the artists throughout the 60’s and early 70’s…..

to conclude todays monologue..I STRONGLY believe that music is for sharing and playing in your own environment so the mix is available to download and if you like Reggae and especially Studio 1 then i implore you to ‘fill your boots’ (and if you like it feel free to share it with your community.)

the bloodSweatandteeS Sir Coxsone Downbeat’ tribute tShirts, (below the soundcloud player), are available in various colours and there are still some sizes left so if you are looking to represent now’s the time as some of the combinations will not be repeated due to my desire to innovate continuously !

the ORiGiNAL ‘SouLRebeL’ tributeTees

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themusicologist meets KiNG Tubby @bloodSweatandteeS

theUrbanMusicologyProJect #1

themusicologist is evolving into a new phase..out of the ‘1 tune’ and into ‘the mix’. Less ‘talking’ and more ‘walking’ with the added bonus of, (for a limited time), being downloadable for themusicologist family, friends,  shipmates, and FULL crew.

FiRST up is a tribute to Osbourne ‘KiNG TUBBY’ Ruddock. the Heavyweight Champion of DUB who is pivotal in the development of not only Jamaican Music but almost every kind of ‘Dance’ Music that followed. Hip Hop, House, Dubstep, Jungle, Drum & Bass..EVERYone of them owes a debt to the KiNG.. So without further delay hold/download this mix and blend of KiLLER DubWise cuts from the KiNGS Studio.

p.s I’m not sure how Long this set will be available for Download as Soundcloud charges a monthly fee, (which I pay), but the package I am on is limited so if you like the set then don’t delay..download today. All I ask is that if you like it then please click the ‘Heart’ to show some love and if you FEELING it strong then a comment would be greatly appreciated.

LiMITED EDiTiON ‘TUBBYs HoMEToWN HiFi’ TributeTeeS designed and produced by themusicologist , (as a ‘momento of the experience’). Available EXCLUSiVELY at

bloodSweatandteeS

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musicology #0649

Hugh Mundell – Book Of Life

Augustus Pablo produced TOP Drawer, HEAVYweight 1976 roots classic from 16 year old vocalist Hugh Mundell..featuring, (among others), Jamaican drummer supreme Leroy ‘Horsemouth’ Wallace on Drums and the mighty EarL ‘Chinna’ Smith on Guitar…selected from the ‘Africa Must Be Free By 1983’ LP

musicology #0648

Augustus Pablo – Casava Piece

Classic Pablo….heavyweight instrumental Rockers cut to Jacob Miller’s ‘Baby I Love You So’…

tunes like these are what inspired the A.P Special tribute tShirt

musicology #0647

Augustus Pablo – Too Late      

I remember the days when themusicologist’s only piece of online communication was here…bwooooooooooooyyyyyyyyy them days are LONG gone. Now it’s Facebook, Youtube, Instagram, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Tumblr, Twitter and Pintrest which are all branches of the #tUmp tree. Of course that’s the way of an Organic, Natural evolving project. The seed is planted and the tree begins it’s journey. Not that I’m complaining, for me, the authentic life is like that. Music was, is and will always be the air I breathe and I believe that theUrbanMusicologyProject is my lifes ‘work’ and I am happy to give it all I have….anyway enough about me and back to the music.

second up in the A.P Special theme is this cut the instrumental version of Alton Ellis’s (previously featured), KILLER: ‘Too Late To Turn Back Now’…

musicology #0646

A.P Special #1

Jacob Miller – Baby I Love You So

New theme starting today and it’s all about the man Horace Swaby aka Augustus Pablo. I’ll keep the narrative brief as it seems to restrict the frequency of my posts and after all themusicologist is primarily about the music..so without further script hold this top drawer cut featuring Augustus Pablo, Jacob Miller and the Rockers crew..

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musicology #645

tUmp #7

the Wailers – Sinner Man


what more can I say about the ‘Wailing Wailers’…the trio who went on to internationalise the music of Jamaica that has since had such a BIG impact on contemporary music especially ‘Hip Hop’ and ‘House’ both of which owe a great debt to the artists, producers and engineers who were always innovating and showing what was possible with limited technology. EVERY 21st ‘bedroom producer’, whether consciously or unconsciously, takes inspiration from Jamaican Urbanmusicology.

From the early 1950’s the Sound System pioneers helped to blaze the trail for what was to follow, chatting on the mic, selecting in the dance etc but it was in the 1960’s and particularly with Sir Coxsone Downbeat’s Brentford Road powerhouse, appropriately named ‘Studio 1’ that the music really took shape. Of course there were other BIG and influential producers at the time notably Duke Reid, Leslie Kong, Justin Yap, King Edwards, Prince Buster but Coxsone was the one who truly moved the focus out of the dance and into the Studio with artists such as the Wailers. Coxsone was a businessman but also a vanguard AND music lover who knew how to pick a winner and without him the musical landscape of not only Jamaica but, (in my opinion) the world would be a different place.

DOWNBEAT THE RULER will ALWAYS be the CHAMPION sound for me.

Wailing Wailers TributeTees designed and produced by themusicologist available EXCLUSIVELY at

bloodsweatandtees

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musicology #644

tUmp #6

the Wailers – Freedom Time

More Ska from the Wailers, who were first introduced to Studio 1 by percussionist Alvin ‘Seeco’ Patterson and went by the name ‘the Teenagers’. Bob had already recorded a tune for Leslie Kong before arriving at Coxsone’s Brentford Road gate but as a (5 piece), group they were yet to record. Lee Perry was assigned the task of making the ‘Wailers’ the islands #1 group and encouraged them to work at their original material rather than the covers that Coxsone, (who was a fan of the group), was forwarding. This SUPERB piece is one of those original compositions..Jackie Mittoo on the keys leading the Studio 1 band, (formerly known as the Skatalites)

 

musicology #643

tUmp #6

the Wailers – Bend Down Low

Original Studio 1 version of Bend Down Low..later revisted by Bob Marley in 1974 for his first solo album ‘Natty Dread’.

musicology #642

tUmp #5

the Wailers – SouL Rebel

moving out of the Wailers at Studio1 into a piece from their period under the guidance of theUpsetter, (for me their most groundbreaking), with the tune that named a whole style…SouL RebeL.

Bearing in mind that Lee Perry had been there since their earliest days it was he who was most responsible, (outside the trio), for turning them into ‘the Wailers’ that went onto to international ‘stardom’. Rumour has it that Bob Marley returned from America in 1969 sought out theUpsetter and asked him for his help to make him a solo ‘star’. Perry convinced Marley that his future lay in reforming the Wailers as their harmony was something almost unique and was the perfect vehicle for creating the ‘Soul Revolution’ sound that would come to dominate Jamaican music over the next few years..

So here is the 1970 Lee Perry produced version of Soul Rebel. Highlighted off the SouL Rebels LP…

BIG Piece of UrbanMusicology from one of the great Jamaican vocal Groups.

the tees below were designed and produced by themusicologist in TRIBUTE to the Cats responsible for delivering some of the most inspirational sounds to ever float out of Jamaica..available EXCLUSIVELY at the home of Authentic tributeteeS …

bloOdsweatandteeS

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musicology #641

tUmp #4

the Wailers – Rolling Stone

one of themusicologists favourite early Wailers cuts…a TOP ranking interpretation of Bob Dylan’s ‘Rolling Stone’ from the time when Ska was slowing down and making the transition into the Rocksteady (1965/66)….I’m getting bored of saying “yet another example of the Downbeat sound” but it is…

musicology #640

tUmp #3

Ken Boothe & the Wailers – The Train Is Coming

more Rocksteady from the Downbeat stable but this time featuring themusicologist’s #1 Jamaican vocalist Ken Boothe on lead and the Wailers on back up…DEFINITELY touched by the hand of Lee Perry and Jackie Mitoo….