themusicologist #0768

Renewal #3

Everton Blender – Dem Fight I

Around 1993 themusicologist was once again focused on the sounds coming out of Jam Down after a 5-6 year sabbatical spent soaking up the sounds of London, Chi’, The Motor City, NYC and Europa.

For me the years between 1992 – 1998 were a ‘golden age’ for the Reggae. SO many top drawer, conscious, deep cuts emerged with the new wave of ‘computerised’.

Not that Jamaica didn’t embrace the ‘digital’ many years before. Everyone who knows can point to cuts [especially those from the hands of the mighty Prince Jammy] that tore up the dance a decade before but the 90’s cuts coming out of labels like exterminator, penthouse, harmony house, Digital B, How Yuh Fi Say That and MANY more one and two shot labels drew not only on the global musical landscape but also and MOST importantly the ‘democratisation’ of music production that had emerged.

Some MASSIVE works were waxed during them years and themusicologist was on them cuts like a rash back then. Consuming box after box after box, week after week, month after month, year after year.

A Few cuts on this Rhythm. This is one of my favourites. Reminds me of them days.

 

 

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musicology #0679

aSongforCon #18

Gregory Issacs – It’s True

“Can’t begin to understand,

I look the same but I’m a different man,

And inside I’m hurting So,

Loneliness it just won’t go,

Since you been gone,

Haven’t been myself,

This must be a dream,

Strange as it seems,

I never thought that this could ever be,

My friends don’t come around in sympathy,

But NOTHING they say or do could ease the pain,

Though I’m trying to work it out,  it’s all in vain”

musicology #0659

Earl Sixteen – Changing World

Jumping back into themusicologist saddle with this Top ranking, Augustus Pablo produced Late 70’s piece of social critique, courtesy of the Majestic Earl ’16’ Daley.

I leave it to the man himself to tell his story…

(borrowed from an interview conducted by father ‘Small Axe’…maximum respect is always due)

Link to FULL interview.

“Basically, I started out on the street corner, under the light post, with all the boys, hanging out at night. I started out at Waltham Park Road, where I grew up, in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of about 13, I started getting into like, Chi-Lites music, ’cause in Jamaica we’ve got a big influence of American music. I kind of started to listen to a lot of soul American stuff, Chat, (Chuck) Jackson (?), James Brown music, and all this and all that. Usually, after like doing my… ’cause you know, I lived with my Auntie at the time. On Saturdays, I used to turn up the radio and do my housework, and listen to the radio, and in the nights, when we get out on the streets, sometimes I’d be singing, “Trash man didn’t get no trash today,” like “People Makes the World Go Round” The guys kind of liked how my voice kind of sounded, ’cause I used to try to sing exactly like the actual records.

In those days, the good old days, everybody was into singing like Dennis Brown. Dennis Brown at that time was like one of the most influential artists, he was really progressive at that time, he was young still. All the school boys and kids who liked music, we used to like always try to pack on Dennis Brown, because he’s like a role model for us. So I kind of started out with that, but I was more like singing falsetto, like Pavoratti kind of stuff. Afterwards, after that, they had Vere Johns, talent contests going on in night clubs around Kingston. There was one at the Turntable Club, there was one at the Vere Johns, and there was one at the Bohemia Club, which was closer to me in Half Way Tree. One of the guys who used to hang out with us, Donald Hossack, he used to teach music like keyboards, piano. He encouraged me to enter one of the talent contests.

During that time I was still going to Church and singing now and again on the choir, and I started doing solo stuff, out from the choir, just singing songs all on my own, because I had this really unique kind of voice and all the people liked my voice. I was in the Church, but I wanted to get involved in some of the Chi-Lites stuff, some of the soul stuff, because the parties were happening, you get the girls and all that. I went to try and get an audition for the talent contest; I was about 14, 15 then, still going to high school. When I went and did the auditions, it turned out that I got picked in the audition, then went to the heats and I reached up to the finals.

In this final, there was like Michael Rose, Junior Moore from the Tamlins, there was myself, there was a girl called Joy White, she’s brilliant, I still love her, and there was another girl, I think it was Sabrina Williams. There was about six of us in the final, that’s a big night. Anyway, I kind of scraped through, I was biting my nails, but I made sure that I did my homework. I practised this tune 24 hours a day, “Peek a Boo,” one by the Chi-Lites, it was a big song in Jamaica so a lot of people knew it. When I did it, I ended up winning the 25 dollars (on) boxing day, I was too small to drink the beers so I had to give them all away (laughs), but after that I started getting the buzz, I started getting addicted to it. I like how the crowd cheers me, so when I left high school, I passed my exams, and I was meant to go to Commercial High School, which is like a college, St. Andrew Technical. I started going there, but I was really involved in the music, I wanted to form a group. I actually had formed a group called the Flaming Phonics. We were doing school barbecues, school fetes, playing in auditoriums around the country, like Calabar, mainly the high schools, Holy Child Girl’s School……”

themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt
themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt

musicology #0653 Perseverance

Tribute to DON Pedro #3

Count Lasher – Perseverance

Big piece of Mento from Jamaican musicologist and knowledgehustler supreme the great Terence Parkins aka Count Lasher whose lyricosity and verbal dexterity is as good as it gets… 1954 Release on the Caribou Label.

Step up Count Lasher for my man Don Pedro…

musicology #588

Flow #7

(Desmond Dekker & The Aces – Young Generation)

Out of yesterdays, (at least for me), Inspirational slice of the Black Ark pie and straight into this sublime piece of Rocksteady from Desmond Dekker and The Aces..

LIsten Tune..

musicology #0581

mOareEssentials #4

(Cedric Im Brooks – Mun Dun Gu)

Been a long time coming but I feel the fog is clearing. Troubled mind can be a living hell. In my world change happens, isn’t forced so I find myself riding the downs same way as the ups…for all their worth. Too often over the past few years I’ve been hanging on by my shredded and torn fingertips, knuckles white as winter snow. Bwoyyyyyy it’s been a long dance but the music’s changed and it’s time to step to a new beat.

Hold this next entry courtesy of the MAJESTIC Cedric ‘Im’ Brooks. Studio 1 in all it’s glory..Second time round on themusicologist having featured it when I laid it down on the BBC back in the day. Slipped it into my set at the weekend..to me it communicates a message of a new day dawning..

musicology #571

EssentialCuts #1

(Justin Hinds – Say Me Say)

Stop, start, start stop…themusicologist has writers block..you know it’s like that when the words don’t come easy but on the other hand it should come as no surprise to me as, (at least for the last few days/weeks/months), words are, (in my opinion), devoid of universal meaning so don’t really have much value? Where am I going with this? F**k knows so I’ll leave it there and just hitch a ride on the musicology train before I disappear into a semantic void.

First up is this Essential slice of the RockSteady pie from the Great Justin Hinds…