musicology#0732

Nubag #1 (a year in the life)

My Mama Told Me – Justin Hinds and the Dominos

monkey-year

So much to say but, words, for me, don’t do thoughts/feelings justice. That said, I will do my best with the vocabulary I ‘have’ in an effort to communicate my thoughts/feelings on the what, why, how, when of the nubag (new bag) that I feel like working out of for the new year.

Interestingly and without my knowledge (but not without my understanding), the time has come and the nu beat is being played and the dance begins TODAY.

Not ONLY is it the dawn of spring it is also the dawn of the final phase (for me) and rebirth is coming as we ‘sail into the mystic’…

My aim is to post a tune every day between Feb 8th (new years day) and Jan 27th (year end), a marathon for sure but I will give it my best ‘shot’. The music will be diverse.

First up a top ranking piece of, (late), Ska from a king of Jamaican music, Justin Hinds (and the Dominos), one of the pioneers of the vocal group style at his/their very best. Recorded for the mighty Duke, the Trojan, Reid and released on his Treasure Isle Label. Echoes of and certainly inspired by Curtis Mayfield and Jerry Butler’s early Soul killer .. I’m a Telling You. One more example of Curtis Mayfield’s contribution to the development of Jamaican music.

 

musicology #0654 Special Event

Tribute to DON Pedro #4

Baba Brooks – Special Event

Don Pedro is a lover of the fine things in life…a purveyor of quality and style. Be it women, vehicles, garments, food, ‘kettles’, ‘Tom’ and anything else that catches his attention. Anyone who knows the Don will clarify that the Cats antenna is finely tuned. That’s not to say that he can’t or doesn’t know how to get down with all manner of people as the Don posseses that rare quality of being comfortable in his own skin and therefore non judgemental of others regardless of how they ‘hang’. A proper ‘man of the world’ the DON has seen and lived more on his travels through life than most. I wax lyrical about the man because those of us who have shared some of them travels can say that they have lived too. The Don asks for for little but gives plenty.

Anyway before i digress and get lost, (im on a TIGHT schedule on this fine sunny morning in London Town), …hold this rip roaring piece of Jamaican Ska from led by one its greatest protagonists the mighty Oswald ‘Baba’ Brooks featuring the cream of Jamaica’s musical fraternity. Recorded for Duke Reid and released on his Treasure Isle label in, (what sounds to me like 1965) ..

BiG Piece of urbanmusicology

musicology #645

tUmp #7

the Wailers – Sinner Man


what more can I say about the ‘Wailing Wailers’…the trio who went on to internationalise the music of Jamaica that has since had such a BIG impact on contemporary music especially ‘Hip Hop’ and ‘House’ both of which owe a great debt to the artists, producers and engineers who were always innovating and showing what was possible with limited technology. EVERY 21st ‘bedroom producer’, whether consciously or unconsciously, takes inspiration from Jamaican Urbanmusicology.

From the early 1950’s the Sound System pioneers helped to blaze the trail for what was to follow, chatting on the mic, selecting in the dance etc but it was in the 1960’s and particularly with Sir Coxsone Downbeat’s Brentford Road powerhouse, appropriately named ‘Studio 1’ that the music really took shape. Of course there were other BIG and influential producers at the time notably Duke Reid, Leslie Kong, Justin Yap, King Edwards, Prince Buster but Coxsone was the one who truly moved the focus out of the dance and into the Studio with artists such as the Wailers. Coxsone was a businessman but also a vanguard AND music lover who knew how to pick a winner and without him the musical landscape of not only Jamaica but, (in my opinion) the world would be a different place.

DOWNBEAT THE RULER will ALWAYS be the CHAMPION sound for me.

Wailing Wailers TributeTees designed and produced by themusicologist available EXCLUSIVELY at

bloodsweatandtees

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musicology #0630

Earl Sixteen – Freedom (theUrbanmusicologist mix)

Today’s MASSIVE cut is courtesy of The MAJESTIC Earl John Daley aka Earl 16..who started his recording career at Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle in vocal group The Flaming Phonics but had little impact until after going Solo in 1975. Teaming up first with Derrick Harriott and then Boris Gardner before linking with Lee Perry in the late 70’s when he waxed a few gems for the Upsetter at the Black Ark..

In a, (top ranking), interview from AUTHENTIC Reggae periodical Small Axe Earl has this to say about the session….

“We actually laid the track with Dalton Browne, that was actually the first time that Steelie came to the studio as well, we first brought him, Steelie, Albert Malawi, (he used to play in sound system, but he’s a drummer), and Dalton Browne, that’s the musicians that we used for that session, and we did four songs all at once. We did “Cheatin” (?) was played by Boris Gardener, and “Bird in the Hand”, those two were played by Boris Gardner, but “Give Black People Freedom” and “Do Good and Good Will Follow You” was played by Albert and them lot”.

BIG piece of Rebel Music, (mixed down by themusicologist)…….

musicology #0628

The Silvertones – Bring It On Home

For the next couple of weeks themusicologist is focusing on Lee Perry, The Upsetter, Chicken Scratch, Little Lee. A man whose impact on Jamaica’s, (and the world’s), soundtrack is, (almost), as big as Coxsone Dodd’s.

No surprise that the Upsetter began his career beside Dodd and even less of a surprise that they parted due to, (as far as Lee Perry is concerned), Downbeat’s failure to reward his creative endeavours….a common Jamaican tale which I am not in a position to pass judgement on, (and nor would I no matter what I knew)

Anyway, the(urBan)musicologist ain’t about hearsay and rumour….STRICTLY music and Lee Perry and Coxsone Dodd helped shape Jamaican music into what we know and love.

Studio 1 carried the swing throughout the 1960’s and early 1970’s but Lee Perry emerged with the ‘Soul Rebel’ sound in the late 60’s and wrestled the (recording) Crown from Sir Coxsone between 1972-1977..Channel 1 was there as where a whole host of producers during the period but, (as with Coxsone Dodd), Lee Perry changed the game.

It was Lee Perry who insisted that Bob Marley reform the Wailers rather than go it alone after returning from abroad in 1968 and history went on to be made. It was Lee Perry whose ‘Black Ark’ RULED from late 1973 until 1978 recording a HEAP of classic, KILLER material with many of the great Jamaican musicologists and whenever we reflect on Jamaican musical history Lee Perry’s name is right up there with the Champions.

Today’s cut is courtesy of The Silvertones Gilmore Grant, Keith Coley and Delroy Denton who first recorded for Duke Reid in 1965? with the magnificent Ska tune ‘True Confession’, (buried somewhere on themusicologist !!) following up with some quality Rock Steady and early Reggae for various producers, (including Lee Perry).

Before I drown in a sea of monologue and information please allow me to cut this short..

According to David Katz’s excellent book ‘People Funny Boy’ the rhythms for this piece were recorded at the, (almost completed), Black Ark and the vocals at King Tubby’s Studio at the dawning of 1973? and the musicians consisted of Hux Brown, Ansel Collins, Ranchie McLean and Anthony ‘Benbow’ Creary…

Finally I just want to add that I rate this tune and the Silvertones HIGHLY…oh yeah….It’s a cover of Sam Cooke’s ‘Bring It On Home To Me’

theUpsetter triButetee available in various colours @

bloOdsweatandteeS

musicology #546

Jamaica #26

(U Roy/Hopeton Lewis – Tom Drunk)

How does it go?…. ..”I’ve started…so I’ll finish”.

Up until the early 70’s, (in Jamaica), there were really no more than a handful of producers and musical styles to contend with, as far as the musicology is concerned), but as the 60’s rolled into the seventies wide ranging changes both musically and socially changed the game. First there was the music made for export to satisfy the English popular market, (loosely termed ‘Skinhead’), headed by, (among others), producers such as Lee Perry, Bunny Lee, Leslie Kong, Joe Gibbs, Rupie Edwards and then there was the Indigenous market that was at first dominated by the Sound System operators. It was in this arena that innovation flourished. That’s not to say that some of the producers mentioned, (especially Lee Perry and Bunny Lee), were not active in both arenas and let’s face it everyone wanted to make money but in truth it didn’t take long for the artists to realise that no matter how ‘popular’ their music was ‘up a foreign’ they still found themselves in the same position financially…..skint..(or for those among us whose dialects don’t recognise such terminology)..poor.

It was into this cauldron that the DeeJay took centre stage in tandem with the version or ‘Dub’, (both hugely influential on all urban music that followed), and the figure that stood tallest at the birth was none other than Ewart Beckford aka Hugh Roy. NO history of Jamaican music would be complete without him. Not the first or even, (in my opinion), the most eloquent but certainly the most important. Today’s cut is from 1971..produced by Duke Reid..Vocal by Hopeton Lewis.

musicology #530

Jamaica #10

(The Uniques – Love & Devotion)

on the previous cut I mentioned one of Jamaican musicology’s prime movers and shakers Edward ‘Bunny’ Lee, (aka Striker/Sir One Strike), and his skills as a record plugger, (originally for Duke Reid). Today though it’s the man himself’s turn to deliver but this time as producer…So many top ranking slices of the Rocksteady and later the Reggae have the Striker stamp that they could easily fill a theme on themusicologist and maybe one day they will but right now It has to be just the one from that long list.

But before throwing down I would just like to add that MANY of the great Jamaican artists have yet to be featured on the theme but what can a man do? I’m sure that over the years they will all be HEAVILY represented, (as some already have), all I can say is that, (at least in my book), every cut laid down on here is a gem so that will have to do.

So who’s up? has to be this one from the Uniques with a personal favourite that I first heard way back in the mid 80’s and has been etched into my consciousness ever since. Featuring the Sublime vocals of first Jimmy Riley then Slim Smith and finally Lloyd Charmers..each blessed with a voice that could ‘charm the monkeys from out of the trees’ On rhythm duty are Cats we are already more than familiar with (Lynn Taitt, Winston Grennan, Gladstone Anderson, Bobby Aitken, Val Bennett, Lester Sterling, Vin Gordon, Johnny Moore)…..MAJESTIC

musicology #527

Jamaica #7

(The Techniques – Love Is A Gamble)

So what could have happened in 1966 to change the beat from the frenetic Ska to the laid back sound of the Rocksteady? Rumour and word has it that it was a combination of things that conspired..First of all popular information/knowledge has it that a heatwave swept the island forcing the dancers and musicians to slow the tempo..secondly as is often, (if not always), the case the time had come for the islands musicologists to evolve and in my experience slow follows quick. Thirdly, (and I’m guessing here), the Ganja may have influenced proceedings…

By 1966 many of the protaganists of the Ska were ‘Beardmen’ and were likely to have been ‘licking chalice’ Up Warika Hills with the legendary Count Ossie. I’m not suggesting that the Ganja was the chief reason for the shift..only one of many.

As for outside influences we only have to consider how Soul and the Vocal Group sound became dominant in America around this time and how much influence the likes of the Impressions subsequently had in Jamaica.

Finally and perhaps of most significance was the Skatalites splitting into two groups after the incarceration of Don Drummond in 1965…The Soul Brothers led by Roland Alphonso, (at Studio 1), and the Supersonics led by Tommy McCook, (resident at Treasure Isle). Notably Lynn Taitt is widely recognised as ‘Inventing’ the Rocksteady with the Hopeton Lewis cut ‘Take It Easy’ but other early pieces included Alton Ellis’s ‘Girl I’ve Got A Date’ and Derrick Morgan’s ‘Rougher Than Rough’, (all of which featured Lynn Taitt’s guitar).  Whatever the reasons for the emergence of Rocksteady it was at this junction that ‘Reggae’ began to take shape with the Bass rising to prominence and it must be said, (at least from my perspective), that Duke Reid wore the Rocksteady Crown.

So with that in mind the first cut has to go to the Duke and the Majestic Vocal Group known as the Techniques whose fluctuating line up included some of the great Jamaican vocalists; Slim Smith, Pat Kelly and Winston Riley as well as Junior Menz and original members Frederick Waite and Franklyn White. Clearly influenced by The Impressions this one epitomises Jamaican Vocal Group Harmony. 1967? recording on the Treasure Isle label.

musicology #525

Jamaica #5

(Edwards All Stars – North Coast)

Was unable to spare the time to throw down yesterday..played out last night at a very dear and cherished friend’s birthday bash and spent most of the day preparing the set. Anyway explanations aside and moving on from Don Drummond at the Duke’s Treasure Isle to a cut delivered by one of the other major Ska producers and sound systems of the time; King Edwards, (The Giant). Don’t know hardly anything about the Cat other than he had a major Sound that for a while competed with the players; Sir Tom The Great Sebastian, Duke Reid, (The Trojan), Sir Coxsone Downbeat, Lord Koos, and V-Rocket on top of producing some BOSS Ska.

His main DJ, (not selector), was none other than Sir Lord Comic who went on to record what is considered to be the first ‘DJ’ cut, (Ska-ing West), in 1966 at the dawn of a new era, (Rock Steady), but more about that next week. This week it’s all about the Ska and this piece is a rare, (and I mean rare), treat. 1965 release on the, (English), Rio label. Credited to the Edwards All Stars but better known as the Skatalites.

musicology #524

Jamaica #4

(Don Drummond – Treasure Isle)

Looking to catch the earlier train with today’s cut otherwise I find myself too far behind the 8 Ball which is no place to be for the I. That and having too many plates up there spinning take too much of my time and energy which I haven’t got to spare. I would rather spend it with my children, listening to, finding and curating music or with my spars.

So on with the journey..day four of the Jamaican Musical History excursion and so far we have heard from two of the foremost producers of the period Downbeat the Ruler  and Prince Buster so today it’s the turn of Duke Reid aka The Trojan whose Soundclashes with Coxsone are the stuff of myth and legend. Of all the islands sound systems It was these two who contested with the most ferocity and passion both musically and physically leading to heated battles between them and their respective followers both in and out of the dance. Pitched battles were fought in an attempt to intimidate and lock off the opposing sound and in part it was out of this culture that the Rude Boy emerged. Combined with Jamaica’s violent and rebellious history as well as the abject poverty and general lawlessness especially in the ghettos of Kingston the ingredients were all there to light the fuse that would eventually blow up in all out political warfare in the 70’s but I’ll get to that later on in the theme when the right time come.

Back to the Ska and Duke Reid..for me what has always distinguished The Trojan’s Treasure Isle sound is it’s sweetness and light. As far as I know Reid never allowed Ganja to be smoked in the studio or entertained any kind of Rasta ideology whereas Coxsone turned a blind eye knowing that not only did it stir the creative juices, (which it does), but that Rasta was beginning to have a major impact in Jamaican ghetto life..Duke Reid was a traditionalist and considerably older than the young and visionary Coxsone but the music produced in his studio, (and he had a speaker wired up in his Liquor store so that he could hear what was being recorded), was as good as anything produced. It was with the Rocksteady that Duke Reid truly came into his own but he was also responsible for producing some BOSS Ska as witnessed with this piece courtesy of the legendary Don Drummond..Original Skatalite, Trombonist supreme and leading light in Jamaican musical history. No one rocked the instrument like the Don and although his story ended in violence and mental illness his music will forever stand as his legacy. Quite Simply..this is Ska

LISTEN TUNE

musicology #523

Jamaica #3

(Prince Buster – Linger On)

Moving out of the Studio 1, (before it threatens to consume the WHOLE theme), and into a cut from one of the other notable players in the development of Jamaican musicology…Cecil Bustamente Campbell who along with Sir Coxsone, Duke Reid, Justin Yap and King Edwards had a major impact on the Ska.

Prince Buster, (so named because of his boxing prowess), was a security man for Downbeat in the early 60’s but turned his talented hands to recording and producing in 1962 after leaving Coxsone. Today’s 1964? cut is a piece from the ‘Golden Age’ paying tribute to the legend known then as Cassius Clay. Note the innovative Reverb technique employed by Buster which at the time must have been well and truly ‘modern’. The musicians backing the man were known as Buster’s All Stars and included legends Val Bennet, Raymond Harper, Baba Brooks, Junior Nelson, Rico Rodriguez, Earnest Ranglin, Jerry Haynes, Gladstone Anderson and Arkland Parks.

musicology #522

Jamaica #2

(Jackie Opel – You’re Too Bad)

Various Cats have laid claim to ‘inventing’ the Ska but as far as I can hear it seems to have been more of an evolution. In an attempt to provide a little insight for those who are not clued up on the historicity of Jamaican musicology before Ska there was what’s known as ‘Shuffle’ which to be brutal was more of a home grown version of American Jump/Rhythm & Blues so popular in the dance. Early Operators such as Tom The Great Sebastian and Count Nick were followed by hungrier Cats such as Duke Reid, Coxsone Dodd and Prince Buster who needed a constant source of new material to ‘mash up the dance’ and ‘Kill’ opposing Sound Systems. The competition was ferocious and it was this more than anything that fed the emerging scene for home grown talent. Combine such a need for a constant supply of fresh cuts, (Concurrent with the decline of Rhythm and Blues and looming Independence from colonial rule), with Jamaica’s strong sense of ‘national’ pride and identity and the stage was set for ‘Ska’

Coxsone led the way by setting up the legendary Studio 1 recording studio in 1963 and the icing on the cake was a collective of the hottest musicologists on the island coming together in 1964 as the Skatalites. As previously mentioned on themusicologist Jackie Mittoo was Coxsone’s musical director and as such is as responsible as anyone for defining Ska.

Today’s cut is a prime slice of the Skatalites pie from 1964? featuring the majestic Jackie Opel on vocals and the combined talents of any number of Tommy McCook, Roland Alphonso, Lloyd Brevett, Lloyd Knibb, Lester Sterling, Don Drummond, Jah Jerry, Jackie Mittoo, Johnny Moore and Percival Dillon…in a word..BOSS

musicology #507

CoversWeek2 #4

(Cornell Campbell – Ten To One)

Slipping back into the sweet sounds of Jamaica for today’s cut with a piece by one of the islands great artists the MAJESTIC and pioneering Cornell Campbell . A Cat who begun his recording career at the tender age of 11 in the mid 1950’s for Coxsone, moved on to record with King Edwards in the mid 60’s, harmonised within ‘The Sensations’ for Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle, returned triumphantly to Studio 1 with ‘The Eternals’ and then begun a long solo career that continues HALF A CENTURY later to this day.

Here heard cutting his teeth on a Curtis Mayfield and The Impressions soul classic. As far as I’m concerned an absolute marrow trembler from start to finish and yet another musical diamond mined from the Studio1 archives. One listen should leave us in no doubt as to the influence both Curtis Mayfield and Coxsone Dodd had on Jamaican musicology….LISTEN TUNE.

musicology #504

CoversWeek2 #1

(Hortense Ellis – Sitting In The Park)

This week I’m revisiting an earlier musicology theme concerning cover versions. Cat’s got my tongue a piece today and I have plenty to do regarding ‘the project’ so I’ll just get straight down to business and kick off the proceedings with  Hortense Ellis’s top ranking Studio1 version of Billy Stewart’s Soul classic ‘Sitting In The Park’. Always been a bit of a mystery to me why there are so few female singers to have emerged from Jamaica…The only three I can think of are Marcia Griffiths, Phyllis Dillon and Hortense Ellis?..During her career Hortense recorded for all the top producers Coxsone, Duke Reid, Lee Perry, Bunny Lee, Gussie Clarke but, (like 99% of all Jamaican artists), never had any great commercial success….shame.

musicology #327

DownbeatTheRuler #7

(Charlie Organaire – Rude Boy Charlie)

Day 7 of the Downbeat selection is a roasting piece of Ska featuring Harmonica player, producer and original member of Bobby Aitken’s Rocksteady pioneers The Caribbeats, Charles Cameron. Anytime you hear a harmonica played on a slice of Jamaican music, (especially Ska and Rocksteady), more than likely it’s the ‘Organaire’ blowing on sessions for the likes of Coxsone, (of course), Prince Buster, Duke Reid and King Edwards as well as many others.

This cut is also likely to feature the musical talents of Lloyd Brevett on Bass, Lloyd Knibb on Drums, Jah Jerry Haynes, on Guitar and Jackie Mittoo on piano the musical backbone apoun which the Studio 1 sound and success was built.

musicology #326

DownbeatTheRuler #6

(Dave Barker – Johnny Dollar)

Today’s page of the Downbeat story is a 45 from an artist known by the name of Dave Barker, (a nom de plume courtesy of Lee Perry), who is probably best known for his part on the well known single ‘Double Barrel’. A singer and ‘DJ’ who was among the earliest proponents of the ‘chatting’ style made popular by such luminaries as U-Roy, Dennis Alcapone, I-Roy and Dillinger. There were earlier Cats who dropped ‘chat pon the mic’ but it wasn’t until Hugh Roy stepped up that the genre came of age and flew out of the dance and into the recording studio in 1970 on Arthur ‘Duke ‘ Reid’s definining rocksteady rhythms.

This one, a 1970 cut on the English Studio 1 subsidary label Ackee, is a cover of Garnett Mimm’s earlier majestic 1964 Soul recording ‘A Quiet Place’ and finds Mr Barker, who in my opinion was a much better singer than ‘DJ’, in fine voice expressing concerns about people intruding on his quiet time.

musicology #323

DownbeatTheRuler #3

(Alton & Hortense Ellis – Easy Squeeze)

Out all day yesterday working the tees so apologies for not dropping a next ‘Downbeat bomb’ through your speakers. Hopefully today’s slice of the Coxsone pie will make up for it.

A classic piece of Brentford Road Rock Steady that has trembled my marrow for many years. Could have thrown it down a few times on previous themes but for reason unbeknown to ‘mesang’ didn’t until today.

One of the most emotive, hard hitting, Rough & Tough cuts of the Rock Steady period in my humble opinion…lyrics, vocals, music all combining in soul searching harmony to communicate a message concerning  the quest for that most elusive of feelings, True Love.

Recorded and first released in 1966? for Dodd by the Godfather Of Rocksteady Alton Ellis alongside his younger Sister Hortense, both of whom are sadly no longer with us. What is however (and will be for as long as music like this is being loved and played), are their ‘works’ many of which sit comfortably at the very top of the musicology tree.

Hortense was Jamaica’s ‘first female vocalist’ cutting her teeth as early as 1959 on such legendary talent shows as Vere John’s Opportunity hour, (where many a ‘Jam Down’ legend begun their careers), but it wasn’t until a few years later in 1961 under the tutelage of Downbeat that she begun a recording career. For sure having Alton as a brother helped but anyone who has heard her sing would agree that merit was the foundation stone apoun which she built a career that stretched right up to her untimely death in 2000 AD. Recording for many of the greatest Jamaican producers such as Duke Reid, Bunny Lee, Harry Mudie and Gussie Clarke, (to name a few)

As regulars may be aware Alton has featured more than any other Jamaican artist on themusicologist over the preceeding two years so I won’t wax lyrical on the man and his music today other than to reiterate that it was he and the previous Artist, (Bob Andy), who first opened my ears and heart to Downbeat The Ruler’s output and for that I am eternally grateful..

So in Tribute to the memories of Alton, Hortense and Clement Seymour ‘Sir Coxsone / Downbeat The Ruler’ Dodd hold this…..

musicology #301

JamaicanVocalGroupAction #12

(The Uniques – Hooray, (One Fine Day)

Seeing this theme through until the end of the week and then I’ll be rolling out something fresh on Monday. Just like to thank all you Cats for the visits and comments on the Wailers cut, (and tee), most apprecited. Following a marrow trembler like that is nigh on impossible..one of them cuts that has left me ‘chewing canvas’ to use an old boxing colloquilism…you know the score, hanging on to the opponent for dear life hoping that the bell tolls for the end of the round..so without further delay hold this cut from one of Jamaica’s finest vocal groups The Uniques featuring one of the greatest vocalists to ever grace the M.I.C…Keith ‘Slim’ Smith, alongside Jimmy Riley and Lloyd ‘Charmers’ Tyrel with a first outing on themusicologist. A 1967 Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee production that sounds like it was recorded at the Dukes ‘Treasure Isle’ studio…the home of Rocksteady.

musicology #295

JamaicanVocalGroupAction #6

(Dion Cameron & The Three Tops – Get Ready)

Today’s 1966 cut is one from themusicologist’s Ska box courtesy of the almost unknown Dion Cameron & The Three Tops who are perhaps better known for the few slices released on Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle label, This one is An ‘Olive Branch’? production released in the UK on the Rio label. Can’t tell you much more about it other than it was one of my earliest purchases back in the early 80’s.. Ranking Saxaphone break on this one.

musicology #267

sleighbellsring #15

(Owen Gray – Collins Greetings)

Was just about to lay down a doo wop slice of the christmas pie until this one floated out of the speakers…

Instinctively I would say it’s a Duke Reid piece of Rocksteady, I have it by someone else.., (I think it’s a cut of ‘People Get Ready’ by Alton Ellis ), but as it’s Owen Gray it could also be a Coxsone production. Whoever produced it…well done and thank you.