musicology #0661

Lishonile – Batsumi

 

 

Frequently updating themusicologist would be a ‘walk in the park’ if it wasn’t for the narrative that accompanies each cut. I listen to music every day and am constantly turning up incredible slices of top drawer urbanemusicology. 45 years of listening to superb music counts for something and for me the knowledgehustle is what matters. NOT the medium it is on, it’s rarity, economic value or even the artist(s) involved. To be honest I don’t give a f**k about the category/label … do the combined frequencies and harmonies reach out and touch me or not is my ONLY concern. That said I appreciate that such details are important to some of the Cats out there and if that’s your bag…all power to you.

For the next few weeks I’m going to go small on the narrative and BIG on the music to get themusicologist back into the groove and always follow the Louis Armstrong maxim of playing “the good kind” of music.

musicology #0660

Antonio Machin – Lindas Cubanos

Back in the saddle with this majestic piece courtesy of vocalist supreme Antonio Machin featuring Daniel Sanchez. Born in Sagua La Grande in 1903 to a Cuban woman and a Spanish father the youngblood found himself working at a young age to support the family. The story goes that he was singing quietly to himself when a priest passed by and was so taken by his voice that he urged him to sing in public. Young Antonio obliged and tore it up in his first performance, (Schubert’s Ave Maria), determined to make something of himself he dedicated his life to learning the art and craft of the vocalist. By the age of 20 he was the ladies choice on the manor and in 1926 he moved to the big smoke, (Havana), and earned a position as a singer in a Cafe. It wasn’t long before he began to make waves and found himself singing in (Big) Don Azpiazu’s Orchestra at the Havana Casino. Four years later and the Don’s fame led them to New York City where they laid down a 78 titled ‘El manisero’ which went on to be the first Cuban hit in America. Not wishing to return to Cuba he settled in New York and in 1932 formed the Cuarteto Machín with Puerto Rican natives Plácido Acevedo (trumpet), Cándido Vicenty (tres) and Daniel Sánchez (second voice and guitar). Recording over 200 cuts of prime Carribean/Latino the Cuarteto evolved into the Sexteto adding the imperious Remberto Lara.

In 1935 He left New York and landed in London and then moved over to Paris before finally settling in Madrid at the end of the 1930′s. ‘Father’ Machin is a Cuban music legend and one listen to his ‘work’ should guarantee that all genuine musicologists take note, (if not already known), of his name. Cuban music had a MAJOR influence on ‘Popular’ music and elements are heard in many musical styles from the Salsa of Brazil to the Ska of Jamaica. This cut was recorded between 1933-34

“The music of Cuba developed from a unique set of historical and social circumstances. African slaves, brought to work on the Spanish sugar plantations, soon outnumbered the European colonists. The attitude of the Spanish political and religious institutions towards African culture, while undeniably oppressive, was more open than in some other colonial societies. Catholic priests did their best to convert the Africans to Christianity, but they overlooked their worship of African deities as long as they gave them Christian names. In fact, santeria, a religion that combines Catholicism with African deities and rituals, is still a key part of Cuban spiritual life.

Son developed around the turn of the century in Oriente, a region in eastern Cuba. Migrating musicians brought son west to Havana in the 1920s, where it exploded in popularity. The fundamental element of the son is a rhythmic pattern called clave (lit. “key”). Played on two wooden sticks, called claves, this repetitive beat is the foundation upon which all of the other musical elements are structured. It gives son the propulsive swing that has endeared it to people around the world.” – Putumayo

musicology #0659

Earl Sixteen – Changing World

Jumping back into themusicologist saddle with this Top ranking, Augustus Pablo produced Late 70′s piece of social critique, courtesy of the Majestic Earl ’16′ Daley.

I leave it to the man himself to tell his story…

(borrowed from an interview conducted by father ‘Small Axe’…maximum respect is always due)

Link to FULL interview.

“Basically, I started out on the street corner, under the light post, with all the boys, hanging out at night. I started out at Waltham Park Road, where I grew up, in Kingston, Jamaica. At the age of about 13, I started getting into like, Chi-Lites music, ’cause in Jamaica we’ve got a big influence of American music. I kind of started to listen to a lot of soul American stuff, Chat, (Chuck) Jackson (?), James Brown music, and all this and all that. Usually, after like doing my… ’cause you know, I lived with my Auntie at the time. On Saturdays, I used to turn up the radio and do my housework, and listen to the radio, and in the nights, when we get out on the streets, sometimes I’d be singing, “Trash man didn’t get no trash today,” like “People Makes the World Go Round” The guys kind of liked how my voice kind of sounded, ’cause I used to try to sing exactly like the actual records.

In those days, the good old days, everybody was into singing like Dennis Brown. Dennis Brown at that time was like one of the most influential artists, he was really progressive at that time, he was young still. All the school boys and kids who liked music, we used to like always try to pack on Dennis Brown, because he’s like a role model for us. So I kind of started out with that, but I was more like singing falsetto, like Pavoratti kind of stuff. Afterwards, after that, they had Vere Johns, talent contests going on in night clubs around Kingston. There was one at the Turntable Club, there was one at the Vere Johns, and there was one at the Bohemia Club, which was closer to me in Half Way Tree. One of the guys who used to hang out with us, Donald Hossack, he used to teach music like keyboards, piano. He encouraged me to enter one of the talent contests.

During that time I was still going to Church and singing now and again on the choir, and I started doing solo stuff, out from the choir, just singing songs all on my own, because I had this really unique kind of voice and all the people liked my voice. I was in the Church, but I wanted to get involved in some of the Chi-Lites stuff, some of the soul stuff, because the parties were happening, you get the girls and all that. I went to try and get an audition for the talent contest; I was about 14, 15 then, still going to high school. When I went and did the auditions, it turned out that I got picked in the audition, then went to the heats and I reached up to the finals.

In this final, there was like Michael Rose, Junior Moore from the Tamlins, there was myself, there was a girl called Joy White, she’s brilliant, I still love her, and there was another girl, I think it was Sabrina Williams. There was about six of us in the final, that’s a big night. Anyway, I kind of scraped through, I was biting my nails, but I made sure that I did my homework. I practised this tune 24 hours a day, “Peek a Boo,” one by the Chi-Lites, it was a big song in Jamaica so a lot of people knew it. When I did it, I ended up winning the 25 dollars (on) boxing day, I was too small to drink the beers so I had to give them all away (laughs), but after that I started getting the buzz, I started getting addicted to it. I like how the crowd cheers me, so when I left high school, I passed my exams, and I was meant to go to Commercial High School, which is like a college, St. Andrew Technical. I started going there, but I was really involved in the music, I wanted to form a group. I actually had formed a group called the Flaming Phonics. We were doing school barbecues, school fetes, playing in auditoriums around the country, like Calabar, mainly the high schools, Holy Child Girl’s School……”

themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt

themusicologist/bloodsweatandtees tribute to Pablo tShirt

bloodSweatandteeS Special

bSt-JULY13-SPECiAL-Coxson-ARMY

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musicology #0658

Out On The Ocean Sailing – Ann Cole & the Colmanaires

BIG piece of ‘golden age’ Gospel from themusicologist vaults featuring the sublime vocals of one of the greatest female vocalists (n)ever known, (outside of the knowledge hustler tribe), Cynthia Coleman aka Ann Cole ably backed by the Colmanaires, Joe Walker, Sam Walker, and Wesley Johnson. Ann and the Colmanaires toured with Muddy Waters in ’56 where Muddy heard her performing Preston Fosters Got My MoJo Working and the rest is Rhythm & Blues history..

Today’s cut marks another step on the journey for themusicologist..i hope you are listening ’cause If I ever needed someone I need you..

musicology #0657

todays post is the first in a series of ‘sets’ laid down ..going back to themusicologist roots..

featuring some HEAVYWEiGHT cuts from across the musical and vibrational spectrum. two ways to ‘consume’ it

1:Here on themusicologist ..

2:Via my mixcloud feed

 

http://www.mixcloud.com/themusicologist/the-way-i-feel-today/

the set represents/symbolises how i feel right here…right now after receiving and trying to process some disheartening news received this week.

John Coltrane, Miles Davies, Terry Callier, Benga, Chamillionaire, Gorillaz, Dean Blunt, Lonnie Liston Smith and more all feature along the way.  a BURIAL set from me. experimental, brok foot selection from the deepest recesses of a mans Soul.

fuck the words…the music is where it is.

musicology #0656

Tribute to Don Pedro #6

the Sensations – Right On Time

Out of the Rhythm & Blues and into the Rocksteady with this majestic cover of the Impressions cut. Rarely does a cover do justice to the original for me but this one is an exception to the rule..

Written by Master Curtis Mayfield and originally recorded by the Impressions for the 1966 Ridin’ High LP the Sensations recorded this version in 1967. Released in the UK on Graeme Goodall’s Doctor Bird label this is a BiG piece from the Sensations, a group originally formed by Jimmy Riley and Cornel Campbell that featured, (along the way), Buster Riley, Aaron ‘Bobby’ Davis, Johnny Osbourne and Jackie Parris, who the lead is on todays fine piece im not sure but i’m guessing its Jackie Parris rather than Jimmy who had moved onto one of Jamaica’s greatest vocal groups the Uniques by 1967 but it could even be Cornel Campbell?

one thing IS for SURE…the tune is a top ranking, nailed on marrow trembler and one that I’m sure Don Pedro will appreciate as the surf hits the shore on another day in paradise and he watches the sun sink over the pacific as the Don is world renowned for ALWAYS being ‘Right On Time’.

BIG up yourself Don Pedro….

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