musicology #373

Modernist #1

(Bobby Bland – Turn On Your Lovelight)

‘Modernist’ was a word used by some on the London scene in the early 1960’s to describe the ‘new breed’ of young bloods that had emerged out of the post war doldrums in Great Britain and had begun to throw off the shackles imposed on them by the establishment to do their own thing. They weren’t catered for or to so had to create a new set of ‘rules’, (clothes, music and attitude), and as a predominantly youth movement were unknown and unrecognizable, (this was when adolescents/teenagers were not even seen let alone heard), to all but those in the know. The influences of this movement were varied, (and will be gone into in greater detail as the theme unfolds), but as is often the case, (in England anyway), they were fused together by a creative vanguard to bear Englands first and most important youth movement.

Today’s cut is courtesy of a Modernist icon who has featured a few times on themusicologist and whose output was as important as any single artist’s in defining the new genre that became known as Soul. Born in 1930 Robert Calvin Bland begun his career in Memphis in the early 50’s associating with a collective known as the Beale Streeters but it wasn’t until ,1958 (at the dawn of Soul), that his distinctive vocal style begun to make Modernists sit up and take notice. Up until then he was a Blues singer but in ’58 he begun to set himself apart from categorisation with a string of monumental cuts of the highest order. This one is a classic from 1961 the year that his landmark album Two Steps From The Blues hit the streets. Many artists have cited Bobby as a major influence including original Modernist David Bowie who is reported to have said that the album changed his life.

Of note is that Bowie was born in 1947 making him 14 in 1961 and ripe for being at the forefront of a youth movement that peaked in London in 1964, (not sure about anywhere else as I have no background knowledge), and fell soon after when the media packaged it as ‘Mod’. Just like to add that In no way am I disregarding what came after ‘Modernist’, (especially not as far as music is concerned), but for many who were on The vanguard and had been at it since 1961 the infamous Bank Holiday gatherings signalled the end of the movement they cherished. I know that there will be many who disagree with me about the dates and events and I’m sure they can support their views and present them in their own way but certain dates such as ‘The Scene’ opening in August 1963 can not be disputed neither can the release dates of the musicology that supported and drove the movement as I intend to show. Finally I would also like to add that those born before 1946 and after 1948 must have been on the fringes purely as a result of their age and not their appreciation of either the music, attitude or the lifestyle in question.

All that’s left to say is that this one is for all the Lyceum, Town Hall, Tottenham Royal and Streatham Locarno Cats whose memories of being there can never be replaced.

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musicology #362

Ideology&Philosophy #3

(Bobby Bland – If You Don’t Share Your Love With Me)

Final slice of the Greek Philosophy pie features the other of the three most well known Ideas men of Greek antiquity..Aristotle. A name known on some parts of London’s mean streets for his contribution to Double back Rhyming Slang..Aristotle rhymes with Bottle which leads to ‘Bottle and Glass’ which rhymes/translates as Arse !! for example
“did you check the bottle on that Richard?!!”

Anyway back to the Greeks..Aristotle is quite possibly the prime mover in today’s Western Ideology in part for his clear definition of Politricks. Any major Politician today is schooled in Aristotelian Ideology, (it goes with the territory), why? because it’s much easier to maintain the system. That way the ‘blame’ can always be laid at someone elses door. It’s almost unthinkable that many, many years later the society that we live in has NOT evolved much beyond Aristotle’s (much mis-interpreted), Ideology..Our children, (and us), are steeped in the interpreted version of his thinking. Not that I’m imagining this will be clear based on 2 minutes of interperatation here but maybe it will be a doorway to dig deeper…

The musicology is another slice from one of the greatest Soul singers, (featured a few times already on themusicologist), none other than Bobby ‘Blue’ Bland with 2 minutes 43 seconds worth of pure poetry about what, for me, is the thing that makes life complete…Love.

“It’s an ill wind that blows no good,
And it’s a sad heart that won’t love like I know it should,
And oh how lonesome you must be yeah,
And it’s a shame if you don’t share your love with me,

And it’s a heartache when love is gone,
But it’s bad and even sad, woooohh later on,
Woohhh there’s no one blinder than he who wont see,
And it’s a shame if you don’t share your love with me,

And I can’t help it woohhh no if she is gone,
You must try to forget woohhhh you must live on,
And I swear it’s a good thing to love someone,
But it’s bad and even sad when it’s not returned,

And oh how lonesome yes you must be yeah,
And it’s a shame if you don’t share your love with me,
And I said it’s a shame woohhh if you don’t share your love with me
woooohhhh yeahhh”

musicology #356

AlternativeSoundtrack4 #23

(Bobby Bland – St James Infirmary)

Leaving it all to the dialogue and Bobby Bland today..(both from 1961). So you’ll just have to take a listen for yourself if you want to know what’s occured.

musicology #199

teachings of billionaire YenTzu #9

(Bobby Bland – Share Your Love With Me)

Seeing The Snake (raising awareness and concentration)

After twenty years in the service of a provincial overlord, a loyal soldier was rewarded. With enough money now to buy some acres of land, he was excited at being able to realise his dream of building his own home. For three whole months the soldier totally absorbed himself in preparing the land, clearing it of boulders and levelling the ground. He made sure that any wild bushes and neglected growth removed were replaced with trees and flowers. The work was long and hard but the soldier felt richly rewarded by thinking how pleasent his home would be.

While engrossed in what he was doing, a man came up to him and introduced himself as the land agent in the service of the local registrar.

‘What so,’ said the soldier taking the opportunity to rest, ‘How can I be of service to you. All is well I trust?’

‘I’m not sure,’ said the man looking puzzled. ‘Might I please enquire as to who has employed you on such obvious land improvement?’

‘I am now in the service of my own,’ replied the soldier proudly. ‘I am the owner of this land and I am preparing it for building.’

‘There seems to have been some mistake,’ said the land agent holding out some papers with some consternation. ‘This is not your land, i’m afraid. Your land comprises the acres actually adjoining this.’

‘Ah,’ sighed the soldier. ‘So despite my endeavours I have not done a single thing to improve my own property.’ And with that he immediately set to gathering his tools. The soldier took the mistake in good spirits and after making sure that he was on his own land, he once more earnestly set about making his dream come true.