RESIZED.deepcity

musicology#0733

Nubag #2 (a year in the life)

It’s My Baby – Paul Kelly

Day 2 .. Moving onto a piece of Mid 60’s, (1965 to be exact), Soul from South Florida’s ‘Deep City’ (Miami) featuring the vocal skills of Paul Laurence Dunbar Kelly.

I could go to town on the history and connect the (narrative) dots as to who owned what label, played on/wrote what song, what they went on to do and how influential they were in the development of soul/Rhythm and Blues/funk etc but to be honest it’s far too time consuming so I’ll just name check the cats responsible for EACH tune. In this case it’s Johnny Pearsall, Willie Clarke and Arnold Albury. (writers, producers, musicians, urbanemusicologists)

Released on the ‘Lloyd Records’ label in 1965.

AUTHENTIC music.

 

musicology #525

Jamaica #5

(Edwards All Stars – North Coast)

Was unable to spare the time to throw down yesterday..played out last night at a very dear and cherished friend’s birthday bash and spent most of the day preparing the set. Anyway explanations aside and moving on from Don Drummond at the Duke’s Treasure Isle to a cut delivered by one of the other major Ska producers and sound systems of the time; King Edwards, (The Giant). Don’t know hardly anything about the Cat other than he had a major Sound that for a while competed with the players; Sir Tom The Great Sebastian, Duke Reid, (The Trojan), Sir Coxsone Downbeat, Lord Koos, and V-Rocket on top of producing some BOSS Ska.

His main DJ, (not selector), was none other than Sir Lord Comic who went on to record what is considered to be the first ‘DJ’ cut, (Ska-ing West), in 1966 at the dawn of a new era, (Rock Steady), but more about that next week. This week it’s all about the Ska and this piece is a rare, (and I mean rare), treat. 1965 release on the, (English), Rio label. Credited to the Edwards All Stars but better known as the Skatalites.

musicology #496

SoulBoy #15

(Sam And Dave – Goodnight Baby)

Staying on board the Soul Train for this week as there are far too many cuts and artists who have yet to be featured..Marvin Gaye, Bobby Womack, James Carr, Sam Cooke, Teddy Pendergrass, Al Green, Aaron Neville, Bobby Bland, Solomon Burke and on and on and on in fact a year still wouldn’t be long enough to dig deep into the Soul Cellar so another week is the LEAST I can do.

Too many pieces to choose from…must have lined up at least 5 cuts…just as I’m about to prepare one a next piece floats out of the speakers to distract my butterfly mind. So without further delay hold this piece from one of the great duets Sam Moore and Dave Prater. So electric were they on stage that Otis Redding refused to go on after them. 1965 release on the Stax Label.

musicology #490

SoulBoy#9

(O.V Wright – Motherless Child)

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy. Lee Fields was so hot last night but the Menahan Street Band were on fire. Deeeeeeeeeeep Soul and funk that has to be heard and seen live to be fully appreciated. WHAT a show. EVERY song a winner. They almost tore the roof off at the Bloomsbury last night which considering its underground was quite a feat ! If you like Soul and Funk and they are playing in your town then do yourselves a favour and make sure you attend.

Bit of a dilemma as to what to lay down today? TOO MUCH choice on the Soul front and as I go to lay one down another comes up and ‘speaks’. Been listening to Legends like Marvin Gaye, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Al Green, Leroy Hutson as well lesser known but just as majestic Cats like James Carr, O.V Wright, and a whole host of 45’s from the 60’s and 70’s so rather than face the dilemma I’m just going to lay down this 60’s Soul marrow trembler and be done…..Recorded for and released on Don Robey’s BackBeat Label in 1965, (from the album If It’s Only For Tonight)

musicology #406

Catharsis #4

(Otis Redding – Old Man Trouble)

Apologies for yesterday. Today I’ll make sure the cut is laid down with the post !!

Catharsis..
1: A purification or purgation of the emotions primarily through art.
2: A purification or purgation that brings about spiritual renewal or release from tension.
3: elimination of a complex by bringing it to consciousness and affording it expression.

For me themusicologist delivers all of the above and for that I am more than greatful. In fact over the past few days the raging inner storm is calming and the ‘weight’ is lifting.

I’m assuming that most, if not all, of us are feeling some kind of pressure as the curtain finally closes on the Modern World and opens on what in Philosophical terms is defined as the Post Modern world of, (among other things), decentralization, insecurity, globalization, unpaid work, marketocracy, crowdsourcing and so on and on and on. Many Modern projects that have informed us since the Enlightenment such as freedom, democracy, education and the family are being dismantled and replaced by degrees of economic slavery. It’s always a changing world but sometimes the speed of change is surprising.

So as much as I take responsibility for my actions I also know that there are external forces at work that have a great impact on the herd who tend to be oblivious to the control tactics of the masters. Therefore I will continue on the road of authenticity with my head held high and my eyes, ears and nose wide open and dismiss the one sided Apollonian ideology that reduces art to no more than “amusement governed by empty concepts” and firmly deny Plato’s view that “Art is a secondary imitation of reality and a counterfeit substitute for life itself”

Today’s cut is a fine piece of Art courtesy of the ‘Big O’. Borrowed from the great 1965 ‘Otis Blue’ set….Plato…this one’s all yours.

musicology #371

SuchIsLife #5

(Jackie Wilson – Love Is Funny That Way)

Day five..bit later than intended but Such Is Life..

Today’s cut is from one of the greatest singers to have ever recorded….Jack Leroy Wilson Jr known simply as ‘Jackie’ who ranks right up there with the best. Jackie, Sam Cooke and Curtis Mayfield were instrumental in fusing Rhythm & Blues, Gospel and ‘Popular’ music into what became known as Soul. Of course there were others who deserve recognition but without these three it wouldn’t be the same.

Jackie’s recording career begun in 1951 but really begun to take off after replacing Clyde McPhatter, (who left to form the Drifters),  in Billy Ward’s Dominoes. In 1957 Jackie, (possibly inspired by his greatest ‘rival’ Sam Cooke), went Solo and begun his unfortunate lifelong ‘bondage’ with ‘manager’ Nat Tarnapol who is reported to be the one most responsible for robbing Jackie blind for his whole career. But the least said about him the better. Jackie racked up many hits and was quite possibly the world’s greatest performer whose stage shows are the stuff of legend. He could dance and almost sing anyone under the table but as so often seems the case died broke due to his manager’s ruthless greed and exploitation. This one from 1971, (no idea who is sharing the mic with him), was recorded and released on the Brunswick label.

Listen Tune

musicology #333

DownbeatTheRuler #13

(The Wailers – Do It Right)

Final cut of the Coxsone Tribute. Have to finish up with this 1965 piece of rip roaring Ska sung by the Wailers. Featuring not only Jamaica’s premier band the Skatalites but also no less than Sir Coxsone Dodd himself on ‘Beer Bottle Percussion’ Duties !! Just like to add that many a deserved artist didn’t get a spot on the Downbeat Tribute most notably The Heptones, Jackie Mittoo, Dennis Brown, Sugar Minott, Ken Parker, Cornell Campbell, The Clarendonians..(too long a list to name them all). Some of them have already featured on themusicologist and I imagine that all will eventually..

In addition, the Second in the Tribute Tee series is to communicate my appreciation, (in more ways than one), for the man who made it all possible. Clement Seymour ‘Sir Coxsone/Downbeat The Ruler’ Dodd whose musical legacy is, for themusicologist, second to none. For more information click on the images below

musicology #320

SongsOf Protest&Freedom#6

(Otis Redding – A Change Is Gonna  Come)

final cut of the freedom&protest…and what better way to finish with one of the greatest songs sung by one of the greatest singers. Sam Cooke’s original has already featured on themusicologist but couldn’t pass up this opportunity to throw it down again.

Otis singing Sam Cooke…doesn’t get any better. Taken from the LP ‘Otis Blue’…With Issac Hayes on the Keyboards, (and production), as well as the full Stax/Volt family Donald Dunn, Steve Cropper, Al Jackson, Wayne Jackson, Andrew Love, Gene Miller and Fred Newman.

musicology #198

teachings of billionaire YenTzu #8

(Otis Redding – I’ve Been Loving You Too Long To Stop Now)

Fighting The Rat, (harnessing conscience power)

‘Yao Kou, you promised last week that you would be here on time.’ Tan Lee said to his partner. ‘Yet, you let me down again.’

‘How so?’ the astonished partner replied. ‘Me, late? Well, I may not always be punctual, but I am never late! Anyway, it is not my fault. I had every intention of getting up earlier this morning but, upon awaking, I noticed it was raining so I decided to wait awhile before leaving, as the market road would probably be awash. As it turned out it wasn’t, so I am able to be here now as I said I would be, though I can’t remember promising.’

‘It is said that if you find it difficult to be sincere with yourself,’ Tan Lee returned, ‘it is not possible to be sincere with others.’

‘Your trouble is that you always speak in riddles,’ replied Yao Kou. ‘What has sincerity got to do with it? It is simply that sometimes I find that the ‘I’ that declares that it will rise early in the morning is different from the ‘I’ that exists in the morning, who refuses to co-operate. Having so many different parts of him must be why a man, for instance, finds it so hard to keep something secret. First one ‘I’ makes a promise, believing that he wants to keep the secret. Then, tomorrow another ‘I’ in him prompts him to tell his friend over a bottle of rice wine. With a different ‘I’ in command, a clever person may question a man in such a way that he himself is unaware of what he is saying.’

‘You’re not trying to say that you have revealed what we discussed together last week are you?’ enquired Tan Lee. ‘We agreed that would remain between ourselves only for the moment.’

‘I met with the trader Fu’li, we drank and I couldnt help it. But I can’t say I’m sorry because it has been worth it. Fu’li raised doubts which I believe we should seriously consider. Anyway, it’s hardly my fault. You should have made it clearer or at least given me all the facts.’

‘I could not have made it clearer,’ said Tan Lee. ‘Yet, listening to you reminds me of the teachings of that great sage who visited us from the west:

“If one of thine ‘I’s’ offends thee, pluck it out.” For without unity in your thinking you will continue to justify your own actions through blaming other people or things. It is clear that my “I” met with your wrong “I” last week, so, all of me tells me I must depart…Goodbye’

musicology #154

duets2 #3

(Jackie & Doreen – Welcome Home)

the boxnet audio widget is not working as well as I would have hoped so I’m going to have to make
some changes and find a more effective way to digest the music.

for now though I’m sticking with the duets and another one from Jamaica but this time it’s a 1965 Ska classic from one of Jamaican music’s foundation vocalists, Jackie Opel about whom Alton Ellis once said:

“to see Jackie Opel was a life affirming event – he was a performer in the style of young Jackie Wilson whose act was a predominate influence. Opel would spin and fall to the ground in a crescendo of legs drooping and flailing arms, a small man in stature but a big man in heart and personality”

and from the pen of music critic Al Gilkes:

“On stage Jackie forced his way into the hearts of his audience to make them share his experience. His tears were their tears, his joy theirs …….. Jackie was a prodigy, a rare blend of pure, raw voice and composing ability … what captured you about his singing was its utter savagery: the apparent unlimited range to his voice: … when he sang, every word that came out seemed to come from deep inside with an eternity of pain which life forever bought him ……”

partnered on this one by Doreen Schaffer and to top it all…backed by the mighty Skatalites..an early Studio1 production from right out of the top drawer. a UK release on the top ranking R&B label

watch the ride…

musicology #147

ladiesweek2 #1

(Marie Knight – Cry Me A River)

kicking off ladiesweek with a songbird whose recording career started in 1946 as a gospel singer, teaming up with cats like the Sunset Four and the Sam Price Trio, but it was in the summer of 1947 when Marie begun her association with Sister Rosetta Tharpe that her star began to shine bright, (a year later they cut the majestic ‘Up Above My Head, I Hear Music In The Air’)

Marie first hit the ‘secular groove’ in 1953, moved to Mercury, stayed there for a few years and then began the transition from Rhythm and Blues into ‘Soul’ with a few choice pieces on various labels that include Baton, OKeh and Diamond.

this classic song, (arranged by Bert Keyes and produced by Stan Kahan), is from her final days at Musicor and should have provided her the commercial success that she richly deserved but it wasn’t to be and so she spent the next few years working for a telephone company !! (not returning to recording until the late 70’s)

for themusicologist this is the pick of a bunch of 1965 recordings that epitomise the ‘Uptown’ Soul sound of the period. an amazing reworking of a song sung by such luminaries as Sam Cooke and Dinah Washington but of all of them this is the ‘best’. !! more than likely it’s the Cookies singing backup but Marie’s voice soars above the clouds and hits the highest heights.

musicology #130

instrumentalsweek #3

(Roland Alphonso – Jazz Ska)

this prime slice of Jamaican musicology comes from the King Edwards stable and features many of the best proponents of the Ska style. Baba Brooks, Arkland ‘Drumbago’ Parks, Lester Sterling and tenor sax king, Roland Alphonso.

Recorded and released on the King Edwards label in 1965 at the height of the genres popularity, (it would only be a year before Rock Steady became the ‘in thing’), this is Ska at it’s finest.

musicology #124

socialcommentaryweek #4

(Bob Dylan – It’s Alright Ma I’m only bleeding)

house full of kids today, (easter holidays), so it’s an evening post..

hardcore social commentary from the man who needs no introduction.

must confess that themusicologist’s relationship to Mr Dylan had two periods..the early, (as a young child via my dad), and the second time round as an experimental 21 year old on the ‘bottom lips’. during that part of the journey this one in particular expanded my mind.

a lyrical and emotional tour de force that almost transports me back to me days wandering in a ‘diamond sky’

taken from the 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home..

Darkness at the break of noon,
Shadows even the silver spoon
The handmade blade, the child’s balloon
Eclipses both the sun and moon
To understand you know too soon
There is no sense in trying.

Pointed threats, they bluff with scorn
Suicide remarks are torn
From the fool’s gold mouthpiece
The hollow horn plays wasted words
Proves to warn
That he not busy being born
Is busy dying.

Temptation’s page flies out the door
You follow, find yourself at war
Watch waterfalls of pity roar
You feel to moan but unlike before
You discover that you’d just be One more
person crying.

So don’t fear if you hear
A foreign sound to your ear
It’s alright, Ma, I’m only sighing.

As some warn victory some downfall
Private reasons great or small
Can be seen in the eyes of those that call
To make all that should be killed to crawl
While others say don’t hate nothing at all
Except hatred.

Disillusioned words like bullets bark
As human gods aim for their mark
Made everything from toy guns that spark
To flesh-coloured Christs that glow in the dark
It’s easy to see without looking too far
That not much Is really sacred.

While preachers preach of evil fates
Teachers teach that knowledge waits
Can lead to hundred-dollar plates
Goodness hides behind its gates
But even the president of the United States
Sometimes must have To stand naked.

An’ though the rules of the road have been lodged
It’s only people’s games that you got to dodge
And it’s alright, Ma, I can make it.

Advertising signs that con you
Into thinking you’re the one
That can do what’s never been done
That can win what’s never been won
Meantime life outside goes on
All around you.

You lose yourself, you reappear
You suddenly find you got nothing to fear
Alone you stand with nobody near
When a trembling distant voice, unclear
Startles your sleeping ears to hear
That somebody thinks
They really found you.

A question in your nerves is lit
Yet you know there is no answer fit to satisfy
Insure you not to quit
To keep it in your mind and not forget
That it is not he or she or them or it
That you belong to.

but though the masters make the rules
For the wise men and the fools
I got nothing, Ma, to live up to.

For them that must obey authority
That they do not respect in any degree
Who despise their jobs, their destinies
Speak jealously of them that are free
Cultivate their flowers to be
Nothing more than something
They invest in.

While some on principles baptized
To strict party platform ties
Social clubs in drag disguise
Outsiders they can freely criticize
Tell nothing except who to idolize
And then say God bless him.

While one who sings with his tongue on fire
Gargles in the rat race choir
Bent out of shape from society’s pliers
Cares not to come up any higher
But rather get you down in the hole
That he’s in.

But I mean no harm nor put fault
On anyone that lives in a vault
But it’s alright, Ma, if I can’t please him.

Old lady judges watch people in pairs
Limited in sex, they dare
To push fake morals, insult and stare
While money doesn’t talk, it swears
Obscenity, who really cares
Propaganda, all is phony.

While them that defend what they cannot see
With a killer’s pride, security
It blows the minds most bitterly
For them that think death’s honesty
Won’t fall upon them naturally
Life sometimes Must get lonely.

My eyes collide head-on with stuffed graveyards
False gods, I scuff
At pettiness which plays so rough
Walk upside-down inside handcuffs
Kick my legs to crash it off
Say okay, I have had enough
What else can you show me?

And if my thought-dreams could be seen
They’d probably put my head in a guillotine
But it’s alright, Ma, it’s life, and life only.

Lyrics by Bob Dylan 1965 Warner Bros. Inc Renewed 1993 Special Rider Music

musicology #39

doublebubble .. day 5

(Chuck Jackson & Maxine Brown – Don’t Go)

sticking with the 1965 selection this one brings together two of Souls shining lights that, (as is all too often the case), didn’t receive the accolades due for their musical efforts. Maxine Brown and Chuck Jackson were there recording in the ‘new style’ as Soul emerged from the shadows of Doo Wop and Rhythm & Blues in the early 60’s to become the force it is today. the second tune this week to flow from the pen of the majestic songwriting duet Ashford&Simpson.

just so you know, for themusicologist the term Soul covers any song about affairs of the heart sung with genuine feeling … regardless of race, creed or colour.

musicology #38

doublebubble .. day 4

(Tarheel Slim & Little Ann – I Submit To You)

day late but not a dollar short with this piece from 1965. better known for their 1959 hit, (it’s too late), which made the doublebubble playlist but, for me, doesn’t reach the heights of this one.

the male half of this husband and wife pairing was a foundation soul singer who first recorded gospel from 1946 as a member of The Southern Harmonaires, Selah Jubilee Singers and The Jubilators. Next stop, (1950) was early Vocal Group The Larks followed by some Blues cuts accompanied by the legendary Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee before moving to Bobby Robinson’s legendary label Red Robin ..