musicology0766-bring-it-homedsc_0020web

musicology #0766

#Renewal 01

Sam Cooke – Bring It On Home To Me [Live]

Got ‘SHOOK’ this morning. Powerful.

to FEEL Acceptance, What is, to Be rather than to THINK.

Words are useless in the face of the Real

“might as well try to paint the wind”

Thank you for the guidance.

Valentines.2016

musicology #0737

Nubag #6 (a year in the life)

Belong to Your Heart – Sam Cooke

“A soul connection is a resonance between two people who respond to the essential beauty of each other’s individual natures, behind their facades, and who connect on this deeper level.

This kind of mutual recognition provides the catalyst for a potent alchemy. It is a sacred alliance whose purpose is to help both partners discover and realize their deepest potentials.

While a heart connection lets us appreciate those we love just as they are, a soul connection opens up a further dimension — seeing and loving them for who they could be, and for who we could become under their influence.

This means recognizing that we both have an important part to play in helping each other become more fully who we are….

A soul connection not only inspires us to expand, but also forces us to confront whatever stands in the way of that expansion.”
John Welwood

 

musicology #561

Tales From The Underground #3

The Soul Stirrers – Jesus Wash Away My Troubles

When ‘the Lion’ roars you have to listen..Sam Cooke..the greatest singer ever to record. Rarely equaled NEVER bettered. Listen Tune…

“Jesus wash away my, my troubles,
While I’m traveling here below,
For I’ve, I’ve got enemies..lord you know,
And Jesus wash away my, my burdens,
For they’re so, they’re so hard to bear
But I know there’s consellation,
As long as I know you’re there,
Yes it is, yes it is,
You know Sometimes I feel I feel like a motherless child,
I’m a long way from home,
You know Sometimes I feel, I feel like I’m almost gone
Still I’m a long ways from home
But Jesus take me on to glory lord when I, when I die
For I know that day is coming, It’s coming by and by
Wooooooooooooooooooooooohhhhhhhh.”

musicology #558

Shake It Up & Go #5

(The Valentinos – Lookin’ For A Love)

Penultimate cut of the Shake selection featuring the superb Womack Brothers, (Bobby, Cecil, Harry, Friendly and Curtis), with a 1962 cut on Sam Cooke’s groundbreaking Sar label.  Bobby Womack was a major influence on themusicologist throughout my formative years of the early Seventies. One of the ‘Big 3’ that also included Curtis Mayfield and Bill Withers. Of course there were others but these 3 were the main players.

musicology #500

SoulBoy #19

(Sam Cooke – Somebody Ease My Troublin’ Mind)

milestone on themusicologist…500 cuts and still haven’t even scratched the surface of the vaults !! here’s hoping that you cats and kittens have enjoyed the journey so far. how long will it last? who knows…but I’ll keep spinning as long as I’m able. When I took the first step on this musical journey I had no idea where it would lead. I just felt that the time had come to communicate with the world and open up a dialogue with my heart, soul and mind using the most effective language that I know…the sweet sounds of music. What is it about music that leaves such a deep impression? I don’t know but there have been many books written, lectures discussions and debates around tables, on street corners, in bars, classrooms and hallowed halls for generation after generation and still there are no definitive explanations, such is the power of frequency and especially harmony to resonate deep within us and touch the soul in ways that, at least for me, nothing else comes close to reaching other than that elusive feeling words can’t describe, Love…

I was going to wax lyrical and go right into ‘one’ but, (and I don’t know for sure why?), to be brutally honest with you today’s cut nails the way I have been feeling these last few days courtesy of the one artist who, for me, stands above all others..The Lion, Mr Soul…Sam Cooke without whom the music we now call Soul may not have emerged and even if it did definitely wouldn’t have been the same. Recorded in 1964 not long before the curtain closed on the troubled last few years of his short life. Sung in such a way that it leaves no doubt why the Lion is known as Mr Soul…The man who put the Soul in Soul….what a F***in’ TUNE, (excuse the profanity but the piece always brings me to my knees and trembles my marrow)

musicology #386

Modernist #14

(The Valentinos – Darling Come Back Home)

Today it’s the turn of youth cult ‘observer’ and prolific writer on the subject Paolo Hewitt with what I think is a worthy insight into Mod/ernist that resonates throughout the whole spectrum from conception right up to today and beyond.

“Modernism has remained Britain’s most enduring youth cult because it’s originators created a blueprint that has proved timeproof. By doing so, they put up a safeguard against the transient nature of fashion. Mod has never withered against the ravages of time because it is so particular. About everything, Detail is all. Mod created, for the very first time, a twenty four hour lifestyle that totally revolved around clothes, music, drugs and attitude. They did not oppose society, they simply ignored it. They created their own simple sign language, devised fashion codes and style statements to develop their very own culture of cool. That they were initially hidden from view did not stop them contributing heavily towards the society that ignored. Their demands for clothes and music laid the foundations for the emergence of these industries in Britain and their style demanded a complete shift in attitude towards menswear. The true Modernist transformed London and made it the centre of ‘Hip’. Their clubs were the best in town, The Dj’s played the best and most exciting records and they danced the best dances.

All this because they had no problem mixing other cultures into their own. They were many things, arrogant, contemptuos, sometimes cruel and peacockis to a ‘man’ but they were also open minded and ambitious. One of their credos was simple; if it’s good, absorb it, wherever it’s from. Consequently Mod musical taste was immaculate an it’s development is entwined with the history of Soul music’s triumphant entry into Britain and when it was time to move on they did so. Which is so perfectly right, so perfectly Modernist”.

Today’s cut is one from themusicologist’s vaults recorded and released in 1962 for Sam Cooke and J.W Alexander’s trailblazing SAR label. Hold this quote from the book ‘Dream Boogie’ about the year in question..

“There was a new kind of pride in the air and a new kind of proclamation. Sam’s ‘natural’ hairstyle, (what became known as the Afro), was finally beginning to catch on and a few months later the Philadelphia Tribune defined ‘Soul’, a term confined for the most part at this point to the downhome instrumental sounds of Jazz musicians such as Bobby Timmons, Horace Silver and Cannonball Adderley as “the word of the hour…a spiritual return  to the sources, an emotional intensity and rhythmis crive that comes from childhood saturation in Negro Gopspel music”. “Oh we all heard it said onetime ‘Wonder Boy’ preacher Soloman Burke, a lifelong Soul Stirrers devotee who had positioned himself somewhere between Sam and Brother Joe May in his own persuasive style, of Sam’s new Soul sound. “Pop audiences heard that yodel…like it was some shiny new thing. But if you knew Sam from Gospel, it was him saying, ‘Hey, it’s me’.

This was in the early months of 1962 at the same time that young working class kids in London were beginning to galvanise a new movement of their own and were instinctively drawn to this fresh sound coming out of America’s big cities. The group in question had a name and sound change from The Womack Brothers to the Valentino’s and it was their preceeding cut ‘Looking For A Love’ that provided them with their first breakthrough but for me this one takes some beating.


musicology #371

SuchIsLife #5

(Jackie Wilson – Love Is Funny That Way)

Day five..bit later than intended but Such Is Life..

Today’s cut is from one of the greatest singers to have ever recorded….Jack Leroy Wilson Jr known simply as ‘Jackie’ who ranks right up there with the best. Jackie, Sam Cooke and Curtis Mayfield were instrumental in fusing Rhythm & Blues, Gospel and ‘Popular’ music into what became known as Soul. Of course there were others who deserve recognition but without these three it wouldn’t be the same.

Jackie’s recording career begun in 1951 but really begun to take off after replacing Clyde McPhatter, (who left to form the Drifters),  in Billy Ward’s Dominoes. In 1957 Jackie, (possibly inspired by his greatest ‘rival’ Sam Cooke), went Solo and begun his unfortunate lifelong ‘bondage’ with ‘manager’ Nat Tarnapol who is reported to be the one most responsible for robbing Jackie blind for his whole career. But the least said about him the better. Jackie racked up many hits and was quite possibly the world’s greatest performer whose stage shows are the stuff of legend. He could dance and almost sing anyone under the table but as so often seems the case died broke due to his manager’s ruthless greed and exploitation. This one from 1971, (no idea who is sharing the mic with him), was recorded and released on the Brunswick label.

Listen Tune

musicology #369

SuchIsLife #3

(The Soul Stirrers – Looking Back)

Slipping and sliding from Paul Weller into a slice from the greatest Gospel, (and possibly vocal), group to have ever stepped up to the M.I.C, into the studio or onto the stage, the Soul Stirrers with a fine piece on Sam Cooke and J.W Alexander’s groundbreaking Sar label. I think it’s the majestic Jimmy Outer singing lead on this one backed by Paul Foster, Richard Gibbs, Leroy Crume and J.J Farley. Recorded and released in 1964.

musicology #339

AlternativeSoundtrack4 #6

(Sam Cooke – Cupid)

The Kid has been rolled over by Fats who showed him that not only does he who laugh last laughs longest but also that action speaks louder than words. Talent alone can get you ‘there’ but is not enough to keep you there, that takes character which comes only with experience. I doubt Eddie had been chewed up and spat out like that before…collapsing in a heap on the floor that a few hours ago he was parading around on like a king. That’s a long way to fall from “I’m the best there is” to begging Fats to play him for his last ‘bottle’…

One of the many things I like about this film is how it deals with some of the raw sides of human nature. There Isn’t a ‘nice’ character anywhere to be found, they are all Corrupt, Twisted and Crippled in some way, (like we all are), and when I watched it recently it was a touch painful to be honest..as I said at the start of the theme as a youngblood growing up on London’s mean streets themusicologist identified with the Fast Eddie character and although I was only young, still I saw and was involved in enough ‘experiences’ to gain some of the ‘Character’ that the film deals with. I was always in disagreement with the ‘respect your elders just because they are older than you’ ideology and found it hard, (especially with authority), to accept. I was young and foolish, (and happy..doo doo doo do do do do !!), and was brought up to value actions over words. The man to watch is the one who says nothing not the one who is shouting and gesticulating about what is going to be done at some future date. I was taught that by both the males and the environment that influenced my early life and it has often provided insight during some of my less salubrious moments. Anyway I’m rambling a bit so I’ll get back on the track..where was I…

Oh yeah, Eddie has taken a beating from Fats and after a short sleep in a hotel room abandons his partner Charlie and heads for the Bus Station. From across the room he spots a lone female and makes a move…Hustler style? I don’t know..I have always believed that people are like magnets and some we are drawn to while others repel us. Made more sense when a few years back I read a lot about Frequency and how every living entity has one. Naturally harmony would draw us to those who are ‘playing our tune’ so that together we could make sweet music. What draws the bee to the pollen, the horse to water and the man to the woman..frequency, so with that in mind, (as far as I’m concerned at least), ‘our man’ Eddie is drawn to this woman and he ‘makes a play’.

Sarah, played by Piper Laurie, (real name Rosetta Jacobs), sees it coming and makes it plain that she’s not interested in his advances. She answers him but doesn’t leave him any room in which to manoeuvre so he gets his ‘nut’ down, (sleeps), for a while and when he wakes she’s gone.

Todays cut is one of the great songs sung by one of the greatest singers of all time…Sam Cooke and even though we all know the tune inside out it still kicks arse..tough tune that I could never tire of. Make no mistake this piece epitomises Soul, a genre that wouldn’t have been the same without ‘The Lion’ blazing trails. I have been listening ALL day to music from 1960 and 1961 waiting for the right slice and as soon as I reached this one, (six hours later !!), it struck the right note..so here it is. Eddie doesn’t know it yet but ‘The arrow’ has flown straight into his heart.

musicology #320

SongsOf Protest&Freedom#6

(Otis Redding – A Change Is Gonna  Come)

final cut of the freedom&protest…and what better way to finish with one of the greatest songs sung by one of the greatest singers. Sam Cooke’s original has already featured on themusicologist but couldn’t pass up this opportunity to throw it down again.

Otis singing Sam Cooke…doesn’t get any better. Taken from the LP ‘Otis Blue’…With Issac Hayes on the Keyboards, (and production), as well as the full Stax/Volt family Donald Dunn, Steve Cropper, Al Jackson, Wayne Jackson, Andrew Love, Gene Miller and Fred Newman.

musicology #308

Live&Direct #5

(Lou Rawls – Goin’ To Chicago Blues)

Today’s cut features yet another of the great vocalists…Louis Allen Rawls. Life long friend of ‘Mr Soul’ Who was equally at home singing Gospel, Soul or Jazz whose impassioned response to Sam Cooke on the immortal 1962 cut ‘Bring It On Home To Me’ deserves special mention. A singer of the highest order about whom Frank Sinatra was quoted to have said “he has the classiest singing and silkiest chops in the singing game”…

This cut, first performed, (and written), by Jimmy Rushing and the Count Basie band was recorded for Capitol in 1966 featuring musicians James Bond, Earl Palmer, Tommy Strode, Herb Ellis..produced by David Axelrod.

musicology #304

Live&Direct #1

(Sam Cooke – Somebody Have Mercy – Live)

New theme on themusicologist starting today concerning Live performances. Not that a recording can truly do them justice but other than being there, and in the case of the majority of artists featured during this theme who are no longer with us, it’s the best I can offer. All powerful performances…starting with the Lion…Mr Soul who has already been a major player on themusicologist over the preceeding two years, this being the second cut featured here from the infamous ‘Live at the Harlem Square’ session recorded in 1963. All I can add is that Words don’t do it justice.

musicology #237

inmodwetrust #4

(The Valentinos – Lookin’ For A Love)

today’s slice of the mod/ernist pie, (written by J.W Alexander and Zelda Samuels), features one of themusicologist’s all time favourite, inspirational and also influential artists…Robert Dwayne, (Bobby), Womack who played a BIG part in my musical upbringing back in the early 70’s (continuing up to today). The cat’s career stretches back into the 50’s when as a member of family Gospel group the Womack Brothers he was spotted by none other than the Lion, (Sam Cooke), who was so impressed he remembered them when setting up his ground breaking Sar label and brought them in to record, as well as hiring Bobby as a guitarist and important member of the Sam Cooke ‘family’ both on tour and in the studio. This one is their third recording on the label but their first as the Valentinos.

musicology #228

communication #6

(Sam Cooke – Please Don’t Drive Me Away)

didnt throw one down yesterday, too much on me plate and there wasn’t one tune in particular that communicated the message. today is another day and already there are at least four or five cuts that I would like to lay down. so without further delay…hold this one from another of me favourite artists and communicators…the Lion, Sam Cooke. Taken from the 1963 album Night Beat featuring a sixteen year old Billy Preston on the organ…Arranged by Rene Hall.

musicology #219

12AngryMen #14 (alternativesoundtrack #3)

(The Soul Stirrers – Lord Remember Me)

penultimate cut of the 12 angry and I must say that I’m looking forward to the end. this soundtrack has been the hardest of all to complete. mainly because of my foolishness in deciding to only throw down music from 1957, (the year the film was released), but also there not being any music in the film has made it difficult to edit in. sounds like a case of ‘bad workman blaming his tools’ !! so I’ll move on….

the dialogue features the ‘old man’ whose 20/20 eagle eyes have spotted something that no-one else had noticed and the stoical cat whose conviction in the boy’s guilt has been, until now, unshakeable…

the music, (another of my personal favourites), is courtesy of gospel group supreme the Soul Stirrers featuring Sam Cooke and is taken from their final recording session together on Art Rupe’s Specialty label in, yep, 1957. the year that Mr Soul announced his arrival on the secular scene with ‘You Send Me’. this one, a traditional gospel tune, is given the full treatment by ‘the lion’ as he roars out a plea to not be forgotten.

Listen tune…

musicology #197

teachings of billionaire YenTzu #7

(Sam Cooke – Keep Movin’ On)

Knowing The Eagle, (realising desires; needing nothing)

The great eagle, it’s huge wings covering it’s craggy mountain eyrie, was not immediately aware of losing one of her young as she tried to protect them from the fierce storm. The mother hen in the farm below was similarly unaware that something had dropped into the soft hay of her coup. Reared to behave as a chicken, the young eagle never learned to fly; completely unaware that his nature was to be a king among birds. A passing hermit noticed him awkwardly holding his great wings while strutting and pecking with the other chickens.

‘Don’t you know what you are?’ said the hermit, gently taking the eagle in his arms. ‘Your nature is to soar high in the sky. Come, stretch forth your wings and fly.’

The hermit’s action confused the eagle, however, and as he did not know who he was he jumped down to rejoin the chickens. For several days the hermit persisted, each time taking the eagle to higher ground, saying:

‘Know that although you may live like a chicken, inside you beats the heart of an eagle, a great eagle, know that you are the king of birds. Go, stretch forth your wings and fly.’

But each time, the eagle appeared unaware of his true, unknown, self, and awkwardly hopped back to join the chickens who were scratching for corn in the dust. The hermit noticed, though, how the eagle would cast a few glances at the sky, almost as if sensing something stir deep within its heart.

Finally the hermit carried the bird to the top of the mountain. Reaching a steep crag far above the chicken coup, the hermit held the bird aloft while repeating his words of encouragement. ‘Out there, among the heavens is where you belong. Go now! stretch forth your wings and fly! become the eagle that you are.’

But still the bird did not accept its true power. Not knowing what to do the eagle’s powerful vision swept back and forth from his coup to the sky. He could see the chickens pecking at their food, and felt that he needed to be back there. Then, as if spying something far in the distance, he began to tremble and slowly stretched out his wings. It seemed to the hermit that the eagle was growing in stature and, just at the moment when he could no longer hold him, the great eagle let out a triumphant cry and soared into the heavens.

musicology #83

sixartist,sixtune,sixweekspecial #6

(Sam Cooke – A Change Is Going To Come

had to be this one to finish up the Sam Cooke tribute. one from themusicologist’s top10 tunes of all time, regardless of genre…

another quote from the excellent book about Sam Cooke, (Dream Boogie), by Peter Guralnick

“He had given Rene Hall the ‘civil rights’ song he had played for J.W (Alexander), with no specific instructions other than to provide it with the kind of instrumentation and orchestration that it demanded. Rene was in no doubt as to the momentousness of the charge.

“I wanted it to be the greatest thing in my life……..”

’nuff said…

musicology #82

sixartist,sixtune,sixweekspecial #5

(Sam Cooke – Bring It On Home To Me)

if anyone needed reminding or convincing why the Lion is called Mr Soul hold this one from 1963 taken from what is possibly the best live album of all time. bold shout I know and I’m sure many could offer alternatives but whatever your subjective feelings about it…if you don’t own it..and you want one piece of Sam Cooke musicology ‘wrapped round yer vaults’…buy it…and even though the recording couldn’t possibly do the performance real justice for those of us that weren’t there its the best there is.

a quote from the Sam Cooke book by Peter Guralnick about the show

“Upstairs there was a balcony with tables for the patrons and a small office in which the recording engineers, Bob Simpson and Tony Salvatore, set up their equipment. They monitored the sound at a fairly desultory teenage matinee, then adjusted the microphone placement for the first evening show, starting at 10pm.

Sam gave them a cheery greeting before going on, and then the place erupted in a manner that Salvatore, like his partner a neophyte in the world of Rhythm & Blues, was simply not prepared for.

‘There weren’t any brawls or anything like that, but I’ll tell you, it was like a scene out of a movie, the whole building was rocking, and I remarked to Bob, I said, ‘Oh Jesus, I hope this place don’t fall down’ ”

King Curtis and full crew, (The Kingpins), playing the instruments….

musicology #81

sixartist,sixtune,sixweekspecial #4 (Sam Cooke – Driftin’ Blues)

had to bite the bullet, wipe my hard drive and reinstall Windows yesterday so wasn’t able to ‘throw down’. Back in the hot seat now..with the techno issues done and dusted.

out of the bonus cuts and back into the original tribute selection…

this cut taken from his 1963 album ‘Mr Soul’ finds the man paying his own tribute to foundation vocalist Charles Brown, (a major influence for Sam, Ray Charles, Bobby Bland and a host of singers that followed), with a heartfelt rendition of Brown’s 1946 classic ‘Driftin’ Blues.

musicology #80

sixartist,sixtune,sixweekspecial Sam Cooke Bonus #3

(Sam Cooke – Nobody Wants You When You’re Down & Out)

I know there are many out there who will be relating to and feeling this. no doubt that globally things are ‘coming on top’ for the man on the street and while the rich get richer “the little that the poor man got it shall be taken away”

‘Boom And Bust’ baby…crash and burn .. my advice….fiddle this one while Rome burns.

song written by Jimmy Cox, recorded for Sam’s 1961 album ‘My Kind Of Blues”
(Hugo & Luigi production)