musicology #0749

Nubag #18 (a year in the life)

Trombone Shorty – Hurricane Season

First outing on themusicologist for the multi talented Troy ‘Trombone Shorty’ Andrews a cat who was BORN and RAISED with brass in his mouth.

“So advanced was he that, at the age of EIGHT, a club in the city’s Tremé district, where he was born and raised, was named Trombone Shorts in his honor”.  – Thom Jurek

This 2011 cut is highlighted from the ‘Backatown’ set which features, (among others), one of Nola’s GREATEST urbanemusicologists the majestic Allen Toussaint whose first, (credited), production the 1960 recorded mod/ern/ist R&B classic ‘Ooh Poo Pah Doo’, (musicology #334), was for Troy Andrews’ grandfather, (Jesse Hill).

“What we tried to do with the record is capture what we do live and then just tighten it up a little bit, make it translate on record. Live, we may come across some stuff and jam on it, but the record brings it in and focuses on what we needed to do. We worked hard and we didn’t rush it. I think we alright with this one.” – Troy Andrews

 

musicology #0599

Flow #18

The Showmen – The Owl Sees You

Today’s cut is In memory of another Soul man who has left us…General Norman Johnson..whose voice rose to prominence first as Lead for the Showmen and then Chairman Of The Board. This was one of their, (unreleased), demo’s sent to Joe Banashak whose Minit label ranks high on themusicologist’s list of supreme Rhythm & Blues/Soul labels. Why this marrow trembler went unreleased is beyond me…Norman Johnson Rest In Peace…gone but never forgotten.

musicology #514

Duets2 #4

(Lee Dorsey and Betty Harris – Love Lots of Lovin’)

Slipping out of Jamaica and back to America with this 1968 piece of New Orleans Soul courtesy of Deep Soul songstress Betty Harris in harmony with Crescent City native and Mod/ernist favourite Lee Dorsey. Produced by a man who has featured many times on themusicologist; Mr New Orleans….Allen Toussaint and released on his and Marshall Sehorn’s Sansu label. I’ll take an educated guess and say that it’s The Meters providing the funk but one thing is for sure and that is the contribution Allen Toussaint made to delivering some of the cream of Crescent City musicology throughout the 60’s and into the 70’s. Respect is always due.