musicology #379


modernist #7

(Jackie Wilson – Lonely Teardrops)

Part of the method of inquiry adopted here on this theme is to get a better idea of, (as TonyBlue said in the comments), what, who, where, why and how the nameless thing evolved from the depths of the young Urbanite experience and as far as I am concerned, (and have already stated), the music is the key to unlocking the period. Not only the music of America but also from the island of Jamaica. One conclusion is that in each of the places of note there was a genuine sense of shaking off the chains of Imperial/colonialism and the Slave/Master mentality that had ruled around the world for longer than living memory. Not just in terms of skin colour but also the ‘Class’ system which in England at least was deeply entrenched like nowhere else in the world.

A Cat named Patrick Uden makes a great point on the nameless thing, (we’ll be hearing more from him later), and it’s this

“To be a Mod/ernist you had to come from a culture where Modernism didn’t exist and therefore that made you different and England at that time was ancient it…was falling to pieces. I mean it was awful. You have no idea how miserable and Grey Britain was. The first Habitat shop opened, I think in 1962 in Chelsea and was a complete revelation”

For me the point here is that all over Europe and America the ‘Modern’ had been part of the language since the early part of the century from music in America through to architecture and design in Europe so under those conditions there was nowhere else for a youth movement to be different other than England and especially London until a group of young-bloods emerged to drag Britain kicking and screaming into ‘today’ which according to a Philosopher who I rate highly is the stomping ‘ground’ of the proletariat, one of three ‘classes’ he defines. The other two being the Arisocrat, (who lives in and on the past) and the Bourgoise who looks to and lives in tomorrow. A great observation which for me is spot on.

Today’s slice is courtesy of a member of the elite..Jackie Wilson who somehow managed to shine even under the conditions forced on him by his ‘Master’ Nat Tarnapol. It’s true Jackie was humiliated by recording some awful p(o)op between but as we all know cream rises to the very top of the bottle and in matters musical Jackie delivered some of the best Soul ever made. Hold this 1958 cut to hear what I mean…ignore the terrible backing on this cut and listen to Jackie soar whilst standing on the vanguard of the transition from Rock & Roll into Soul. Again I would just like to add that the cuts upto and including this one are not in any way ‘Rare’ but in the context of ‘Mod/ernist’ there’s no denying that when released they were as fresh as spring daisys.

Advertisements

One thought on “musicology #379

  1. Superb Jackie Wilson track!! his voice is stunning!
    As I’ve mentioned before I was 13 in ’61, and although young I had already been exposed to brilliant music through my parents..they were both in their early 30’s then, fairly liberal minded and loved to party..the records in our home were mainly LPs, artists like Brooke Benton, Della Reese, Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington and Ray Charles….Little Richard exploded on us in that amazing performance in the Girl Cant Help It…and quickly became a favorite in our house along with Fats Dominoe so ‘it was in my bones every time the music carries on….’as has been mentioned it wasn’t easy to access the new sounds coming from america, I used to listen to radio luxumbourg for the American Top 1oo which if I remember rightly went out late saturday or sunday night to hear songs like He’s a Rebel and Zippidi Doo Dah
    ect….It was heaven to find there were djs that played my music to dance and sing along loudly to at venues a bus ride away.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s