musicology #101


sixartist, sixtune, sixweekspecial #24

(Impressions – Never Too Much Love)

you know what…I’m angry. angry with the mountain of useless information that is burying wisdom. why? allow me to break it down…today I ran a search for Curtis Mayfield lyrics. first stop lyrics.com. can you believe Curtis wasn’t even listed !!! let me say that again…..not even listed…

my conclusion..waste of time unless youre looking for the words to popular, (commercial), songs.

only way to do it then is for me to transcribe them myself…there are a few sites with some lyrics on them but I won’t waste your time linking them so in future I won’t be promoting any ‘lyrics’ sites on themusicologist

if anything it has strengthened my resolve to fly the flag for artists like Curtis and keep them in the public domain…back to the music with this uncomplicated plea for unity from 1963. if you think about it who else was writing and performing songs as deep as this at that time?

“after silence that which comes closest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
-aldous huxley-

.. listen them lyrics

too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

never too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

an old story told now passed from me to you
in simple little words to get my meaning through

young and old I feel will understand
take heed everybody to a wonderful plan
we all know how, get together right now
clap your hands, sing and shout

never too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

never too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

maybe you don’t know how to sing or express words the way you like to say
but everybody I know can clap their hands and make a new friend everyday

never too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

never too much love, too much love,
never in this world will there be too much love

Curtis Mayfield, Rest In Peace secure in the knowledge that your legacy and inspiration lives on.

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6 thoughts on “musicology #101

  1. Couldn’t wrap up my contribution to themusicologists’ Mod/ernist quest without paying homage to Curtis Mayfield.

    Synchronicity is what I’m striving for posting this to themusicologists’ six/six/six Curtis Mayfield theme; synchronicity of meaning (Impressions) and synchronicity of solidarity (see #396).

    I thought I’d be clever and combine the “nugget” I dug up on Curtis Mayfield with the excellent spoken introductions to the six/six/six Curtis Mayfield theme. Trouble is, Curtis’s thoughts/words are so good, so relevant, so wise and so dignified…. I couldn’t choose any single one over the others.

    So, typically “Irish logic” fashion, I picked one of the two without a spoken introduction. The idea/hope being you (and everyone) revisit the Curtis Mayfield theme and listen again to the words and songs of a great man…

    This text is off the last page of the 1961 booklet. It’s about The Impressions song Gypsy Woman, which also happens to be one of my all time favorites.

    “………… Curtis Mayfield had been paying the bills by playing guitar for Jerry Butler and writing songs (like He Will Break Your Heart) for him. By his account though Gypsy Woman was originally written as a song to pitch to Dee Clark. ‘It was written when I was still working for Jerry Butler’ he told Alan Warner. ‘I was making about fifteen or twenty bucks a night, and I happened to come up with this idea. It probably came to me from watching western movies, or something like that. It was a description, not just a song. I LIKE TO WRITE IN A MANNER WHERE YOU CAN VISUALLY SEE IT AS YOU HEAR IT (my capitals). Gypsy Woman was produced by Curtis Mayfield and Mal Williams, who was by then Maxine Brown’s husband. In commen with many of The Impressions’ singles, Gypsy Woman made a huge impact in Jamaica, where it was covered by The Uniques and several other groups. The Impressions’ harmonies influenced the Ethiopians, Bob Marley’s Wailers, and many other Island acts.”

    Not taking it away from Curtis, but, considering the wealth of talent around at the time, I wonder why The Impressions were so BIG in Jamaica??

    Well, having just sat and listened (again) to the man speaking, I can hear where those Jamaican Cats were coming from!!

    Like

  2. One of the best tunes Curtis ever wrote {Never Too Much Love} , Done by one of the best bands to ever come out of the Pacific Northwest, The Bards. This band is still around.

    Like

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