musicology #0652 Don’t Let Nobody


tribute to Don Pedro #2

Joe Morris – Don’t Let Nobody

sticking with the Rhythm and Blues selection for round two with more Don Pedro Philosophy..but before, during or after the cut i hope you will lend me your ear as i wax philosophically on this thing called Life…

the age old question of meaning is one i often ponder as i walk down the road and the longer the journey goes on the clearer i can see the path. for me life’s meaning is in the relationships we forge. not the aquaintances, the authentic connections to each other. the ones that present us with the opportunity to be ourselves, without fear or damnation. In the play Macbeth, Shakespere wrote the words:

“Out, out brief candle, life’s but a walking shadow a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signyfying nothing”

is it? … I have been honoured to share the journey with Giants along the way and regardless of how long we rolled together they continue to have a positive influence on me. They are by no means angels of virtue but their actions and non actions have touched the depths of me soul.

Don Pedro is one of them giants and the relationship will always be a cherished one.

This selection is taking shape serendipitously as today’s cut features the Gigantic Joe Morris, (another major player at the forefront of the shift from big band swing to small band jump/rhythm and blues), who, in his brief career, journeyed with some heavyweights such as Dizzy Gillespie, Lionel Hampton, Big Joe Turner, Dinah Washington, Wynonie Harris, as well as being the unoficial house band at Atlantic records in the early 50’s when Cats like brother Ray and Lowell Fulsom were cutting their R&B teeth. His candle went out at the tender age of 36 but half a century on and his voice is still heard loud and clear…

Like the man says..

“Don’t let nobody mess all over you”

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Ian Page
    Apr 17, 2013 @ 18:22:00

    In the early days of “popular music” there were so many great singers that it seems Ray Morris’s singing didn’t get much attention, sadly. Still, as you say, he
    was one of the Atlantic house musicians, so made a reasonable living from his trumpet at least (I hope)

    Reply

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